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Excerpts from what the art lovers of Gujarat have to say on Karsandas Pay & Use. #KPNU #MovieReview #GujaratiFilm #NowInCinemas Proud to be an active part of this novel film.

Excerpts from what the art lovers of Gujarat have to say on Karsandas Pay & Use. #KPNU #MovieReview #GujaratiFilm #NowInCinemas Proud to be an active part of this novel film.

Excerpts from what the art lovers of Gujarat have to say on Karsandas Pay & Use. #KPNU #MovieReview #GujaratiFilm #NowInCinemas Proud to be an active part of this novel film.

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‘Pixel’ is short for Picture Element. When we see graphic images on digital devices the display divides the screen into thousands or millions of pixels, arranged in rows and columns. Each pixel has its own address in this grid and is represented by dots or squares. Pixels build up a sample of an original image and are the smallest component of a digital image. The more pixels used to represent an image, the closer it will resemble the original. The number of pixels used to create an image is often referred to as the ‘resolution’.

‘Pixel’ is short for Picture Element. When we see graphic images on digital devices the display divides the screen into thousands or millions of pixels, arranged in rows and columns. Each pixel has its own address in this grid and is represented by dots or squares. Pixels build up a sample of an original image and are the smallest component of a digital image. The more pixels used to represent an image, the closer it will resemble the original. The number of pixels used to create an image is often referred to as the ‘resolution’.

‘Pixel’ is short for Picture Element. When we see graphic images on digital devices the display divides the screen into thousands or millions of pixels, arranged in rows and columns. Each pixel has its own address in this grid and is represented by dots or squares. Pixels build up a sample of an original image and are the smallest component of a digital image. The more pixels used to represent an image, the closer it will resemble the original. The number of pixels used to create an image is often referred to as the ‘resolution’.

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2013 Invention Awards: Ballast Bulb A household lamp powered by a bag of rocks. More than 780 million people rely on kerosene to light their homes. But the fuel is pricey and is toxic when burned—not to mention a fire hazard. In 2008, London-based product designer Martin Riddiford and his colleague Jim Reeves decided to create a cheap, safe alternative. Riddiford knew a falling weight could produce enough energy to run a grandfather clock, so why not a light? To find out, he attached the crank of a wind-up flashlight to a bicycle wheel. He hung a weight from the wheel to cause it to spin; the wheel cranked the flashlight, and the device lit up. Over the next four years, Riddiford, Reeves, and a small team spent their downtime between projects in a basement, refining the GravityLight. To use it, a person hangs the device and fills an attached fabric bag with up to 28 pounds of rocks, dirt, or other material. Lifting and releasing the bag steadily pulls a notched belt through GravityLight’s plastic hub; the belt spins a series of gears to drive a small motor, which continuously powers an LED for about 30 minutes. The team used crowdfunding to manufacture 1,000 GravityLights, which it plans to send to developing countries for field testing—plus 6,000 more for backers. “It’s exciting to witness so much positive reaction to what we’re doing,” Riddiford says. Besides remote villages, the lamp could prove handy in campsites, closets, and any dark nook far from a socket, so Riddiford also hopes to license a retail version for less than $10. GravityLight: Graham Murdoch HOW IT WORKS 1) As a weighted bag descends, it tugs a belt to turn a series of plastic gears. 2) The gears work in unison to spin an electric motor. 3) The motor powers a small yet bright LED, providing continuous illumination for about 30 minutes—the maximum amount of time that the bag can take to descend. 4) External connectors can power low-voltage devices, and the entire system is designed to work for thousands of lift-and-drop cycles. INVENTORS : Jim Reeves, Martin Riddiford COMPANY : Therefore INVENTION : GravityLight

2013 Invention Awards: Ballast Bulb A household lamp powered by a bag of rocks. More than 780 million people rely on kerosene to light their homes. But the fuel is pricey and is toxic when burned—not to mention a fire hazard. In 2008, London-based product designer Martin Riddiford and his colleague Jim Reeves decided to create a cheap, safe alternative. Riddiford knew a falling weight could produce enough energy to run a grandfather clock, so why not a light? To find out, he attached the crank of a wind-up flashlight to a bicycle wheel. He hung a weight from the wheel to cause it to spin; the wheel cranked the flashlight, and the device lit up. Over the next four years, Riddiford, Reeves, and a small team spent their downtime between projects in a basement, refining the GravityLight. To use it, a person hangs the device and fills an attached fabric bag with up to 28 pounds of rocks, dirt, or other material. Lifting and releasing the bag steadily pulls a notched belt through GravityLight’s plastic hub; the belt spins a series of gears to drive a small motor, which continuously powers an LED for about 30 minutes. The team used crowdfunding to manufacture 1,000 GravityLights, which it plans to send to developing countries for field testing—plus 6,000 more for backers. “It’s exciting to witness so much positive reaction to what we’re doing,” Riddiford says. Besides remote villages, the lamp could prove handy in campsites, closets, and any dark nook far from a socket, so Riddiford also hopes to license a retail version for less than $10. GravityLight: Graham Murdoch HOW IT WORKS 1) As a weighted bag descends, it tugs a belt to turn a series of plastic gears. 2) The gears work in unison to spin an electric motor. 3) The motor powers a small yet bright LED, providing continuous illumination for about 30 minutes—the maximum amount of time that the bag can take to descend. 4) External connectors can power low-voltage devices, and the entire system is designed to work for thousands of lift-and-drop cycles. INVENTORS : Jim Reeves, Martin Riddiford COMPANY : Therefore INVENTION : GravityLight

2013 Invention Awards: Ballast Bulb A household lamp powered by a bag of rocks. More than 780 million people rely on kerosene to light their homes. But the fuel is pricey and is toxic when burned—not to mention a fire hazard. In 2008, London-based product designer Martin Riddiford and his colleague Jim Reeves decided to create a cheap, safe alternative. Riddiford knew a falling weight could produce enough energy to run a grandfather clock, so why not a light? To find out, he attached the crank of a wind-up flashlight to a bicycle wheel. He hung a weight from the wheel to cause it to spin; the wheel cranked the flashlight, and the device lit up. Over the next four years, Riddiford, Reeves, and a small team spent their downtime between projects in a basement, refining the GravityLight. To use it, a person hangs the device and fills an attached fabric bag with up to 28 pounds of rocks, dirt, or other material. Lifting and releasing the bag steadily pulls a notched belt through GravityLight’s plastic hub; the belt spins a series of gears to drive a small motor, which continuously powers an LED for about 30 minutes. The team used crowdfunding to manufacture 1,000 GravityLights, which it plans to send to developing countries for field testing—plus 6,000 more for backers. “It’s exciting to witness so much positive reaction to what we’re doing,” Riddiford says. Besides remote villages, the lamp could prove handy in campsites, closets, and any dark nook far from a socket, so Riddiford also hopes to license a retail version for less than $10. GravityLight: Graham Murdoch HOW IT WORKS 1) As a weighted bag descends, it tugs a belt to turn a series of plastic gears. 2) The gears work in unison to spin an electric motor. 3) The motor powers a small yet bright LED, providing continuous illumination for about 30 minutes—the maximum amount of time that the bag can take to descend. 4) External connectors can power low-voltage devices, and the entire system is designed to work for thousands of lift-and-drop cycles. INVENTORS : Jim Reeves, Martin Riddiford COMPANY : Therefore INVENTION : GravityLight

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Twitter Rolls Out Downloadable Tweets to Select Users - You'll soon be able to download all of your tweets since you opened your account, and some lucky users have already started doing so. Twitter has begun a gradual rollout of the ability to download every tweet you've ever created into an archive that resembles a calendar. Everyone has access to a few thousand tweets they've posted to the site, but the ability to download all of your tweets is only available to a select few users so far.

Twitter Rolls Out Downloadable Tweets to Select Users - You'll soon be able to download all of your tweets since you opened your account, and some lucky users have already started doing so. Twitter has begun a gradual rollout of the ability to download every tweet you've ever created into an archive that resembles a calendar. Everyone has access to a few thousand tweets they've posted to the site, but the ability to download all of your tweets is only available to a select few users so far.

Twitter Rolls Out Downloadable Tweets to Select Users - You'll soon be able to download all of your tweets since you opened your account, and some lucky users have already started doing so. Twitter has begun a gradual rollout of the ability to download every tweet you've ever created into an archive that resembles a calendar. Everyone has access to a few thousand tweets they've posted to the site, but the ability to download all of your tweets is only available to a select few users so far.

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Sony Xperia tipo, Xperia tipo dual launched in India - Sony has officially launched the Xperia tipo and Xperia tipo dual smartphones in India. The smartphones run Android v4.0 (Ice Cream Sandwich) and are powered by an 800MHz Qualcomm Snapdragon processor coupled with an Adreno 200 GPU. The display of the phones is made of mineral glass and is scratch resistant. The Xperia tipo will be available in red, white, blue and black colours, while the tipo dual is available only in black.

Sony Xperia tipo, Xperia tipo dual launched in India - Sony has officially launched the Xperia tipo and Xperia tipo dual smartphones in India. The smartphones run Android v4.0 (Ice Cream Sandwich) and are powered by an 800MHz Qualcomm Snapdragon processor coupled with an Adreno 200 GPU. The display of the phones is made of mineral glass and is scratch resistant. The Xperia tipo will be available in red, white, blue and black colours, while the tipo dual is available only in black.

Sony Xperia tipo, Xperia tipo dual launched in India - Sony has officially launched the Xperia tipo and Xperia tipo dual smartphones in India. The smartphones run Android v4.0 (Ice Cream Sandwich) and are powered by an 800MHz Qualcomm Snapdragon processor coupled with an Adreno 200 GPU. The display of the phones is made of mineral glass and is scratch resistant. The Xperia tipo will be available in red, white, blue and black colours, while the tipo dual is available only in black.

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Samsung launches the Galaxy Note 10.1- Samsung has announced the launch of the Galaxy Note 10.1, an extension of the Galaxy Note category. The device has a 10.1-inch, and like its predecessor, this new device also comes with a stylus called the S Pen. The device runs Android 4.0 (Ice Cream Sandwich) operating system. It is powered by a 1.4GHz quad-core processor and 2GB RAM.

Samsung launches the Galaxy Note 10.1- Samsung has announced the launch of the Galaxy Note 10.1, an extension of the Galaxy Note category. The device has a 10.1-inch, and like its predecessor, this new device also comes with a stylus called the S Pen. The device runs Android 4.0 (Ice Cream Sandwich) operating system. It is powered by a 1.4GHz quad-core processor and 2GB RAM.

Samsung launches the Galaxy Note 10.1- Samsung has announced the launch of the Galaxy Note 10.1, an extension of the Galaxy Note category. The device has a 10.1-inch, and like its predecessor, this new device also comes with a stylus called the S Pen. The device runs Android 4.0 (Ice Cream Sandwich) operating system. It is powered by a 1.4GHz quad-core processor and 2GB RAM.

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Twitter working on a tool that allows users to retrieves old tweets- Twitter is reportedly working on a new feature that will enable users to see their whole tweet history. According to Twitter's CEO Dick Costolo, the new tool will help users to download a file of their twitter history. As of now users can only check out the last few thousand tweets.Twitter over the years has grown significantly and become one of the most effective modes of communication on the web.

Twitter working on a tool that allows users to retrieves old tweets- Twitter is reportedly working on a new feature that will enable users to see their whole tweet history. According to Twitter's CEO Dick Costolo, the new tool will help users to download a file of their twitter history. As of now users can only check out the last few thousand tweets.Twitter over the years has grown significantly and become one of the most effective modes of communication on the web.

Twitter working on a tool that allows users to retrieves old tweets- Twitter is reportedly working on a new feature that will enable users to see their whole tweet history. According to Twitter's CEO Dick Costolo, the new tool will help users to download a file of their twitter history. As of now users can only check out the last few thousand tweets.Twitter over the years has grown significantly and become one of the most effective modes of communication on the web.

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:: SanDisk 128GB Extreme Flash Drive Unveiled :: SanDisk have unveiled a number of new flash drives which have been added to their range. Including a new high capacity Cruzer Glide USB flash drive equipped with a massive 128 GB of storage.

:: SanDisk 128GB Extreme Flash Drive Unveiled :: SanDisk have unveiled a number of new flash drives which have been added to their range. Including a new high capacity Cruzer Glide USB flash drive equipped with a massive 128 GB of storage.

:: SanDisk 128GB Extreme Flash Drive Unveiled :: SanDisk have unveiled a number of new flash drives which have been added to their range. Including a new high capacity Cruzer Glide USB flash drive equipped with a massive 128 GB of storage.

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We’ve been hearing the rumors for months, and now Samsung has gotten official with the newest member of its Galaxy line of smartphones, the Galaxy S III. Samsung announced the most anticipated Android handset of the year Thursday at an event in London. The phone is the third-generation in a line of popular smartphones created by Samsung. The phone has a 4.8-inch touchscreen, 8-megapixel rear-facing and 1.9-megapixel forward-facing camera, and comes running the latest version of Android — Ice Cream Sandwich. Much like the HTC One X, the camera has zero shutter lag so you can capture photos instantly. The camera is also capable of taking 20 photos at once in burst mode, and a feature called “Best Photo” will pick the best shot out of a group of eight. The NFC-capable Galaxy S III has a Super AMOLED HD (1280×720) screen, offering more subpixels than other screens, resulting in improved colors as well as better visibility in bright situations. “With the GALAXY S III, Samsung has maximized the consumer benefits by integrating superior hardware with enhanced smartphone usability,” said JK Shin, President and Head of IT & Mobile Communications Division at Samsung. “Designed to be both effortlessly smart and intuitively simple, the GALAXY S III has been created with our human needs and capabilities in mind. What makes me most proud is that it enables one of the most seamless, natural and human-centric mobile experiences, opening up a new horizon that allows you to live a life extraordinary.” The phone is powered by a 1.4GHz Samsung Exynos 4 Quad processor (see video below). The Exynos 4 has twice the processing capability of the older Exynos 4 Dual used in previous Galaxy phones, and it consumes 20% less power. To achieve this level of efficiency, Samsung has implemented on-off switching as well as dynamic voltage and frequency scaling for each core. All that means the processor will consume exactly the amount of power it needs under any given workload. -Source Mashable

We’ve been hearing the rumors for months, and now Samsung has gotten official with the newest member of its Galaxy line of smartphones, the Galaxy S III. Samsung announced the most anticipated Android handset of the year Thursday at an event in London. The phone is the third-generation in a line of popular smartphones created by Samsung. The phone has a 4.8-inch touchscreen, 8-megapixel rear-facing and 1.9-megapixel forward-facing camera, and comes running the latest version of Android — Ice Cream Sandwich. Much like the HTC One X, the camera has zero shutter lag so you can capture photos instantly. The camera is also capable of taking 20 photos at once in burst mode, and a feature called “Best Photo” will pick the best shot out of a group of eight. The NFC-capable Galaxy S III has a Super AMOLED HD (1280×720) screen, offering more subpixels than other screens, resulting in improved colors as well as better visibility in bright situations. “With the GALAXY S III, Samsung has maximized the consumer benefits by integrating superior hardware with enhanced smartphone usability,” said JK Shin, President and Head of IT & Mobile Communications Division at Samsung. “Designed to be both effortlessly smart and intuitively simple, the GALAXY S III has been created with our human needs and capabilities in mind. What makes me most proud is that it enables one of the most seamless, natural and human-centric mobile experiences, opening up a new horizon that allows you to live a life extraordinary.” The phone is powered by a 1.4GHz Samsung Exynos 4 Quad processor (see video below). The Exynos 4 has twice the processing capability of the older Exynos 4 Dual used in previous Galaxy phones, and it consumes 20% less power. To achieve this level of efficiency, Samsung has implemented on-off switching as well as dynamic voltage and frequency scaling for each core. All that means the processor will consume exactly the amount of power it needs under any given workload. -Source Mashable

We’ve been hearing the rumors for months, and now Samsung has gotten official with the newest member of its Galaxy line of smartphones, the Galaxy S III. Samsung announced the most anticipated Android handset of the year Thursday at an event in London. The phone is the third-generation in a line of popular smartphones created by Samsung. The phone has a 4.8-inch touchscreen, 8-megapixel rear-facing and 1.9-megapixel forward-facing camera, and comes running the latest version of Android — Ice Cream Sandwich. Much like the HTC One X, the camera has zero shutter lag so you can capture photos instantly. The camera is also capable of taking 20 photos at once in burst mode, and a feature called “Best Photo” will pick the best shot out of a group of eight. The NFC-capable Galaxy S III has a Super AMOLED HD (1280×720) screen, offering more subpixels than other screens, resulting in improved colors as well as better visibility in bright situations. “With the GALAXY S III, Samsung has maximized the consumer benefits by integrating superior hardware with enhanced smartphone usability,” said JK Shin, President and Head of IT & Mobile Communications Division at Samsung. “Designed to be both effortlessly smart and intuitively simple, the GALAXY S III has been created with our human needs and capabilities in mind. What makes me most proud is that it enables one of the most seamless, natural and human-centric mobile experiences, opening up a new horizon that allows you to live a life extraordinary.” The phone is powered by a 1.4GHz Samsung Exynos 4 Quad processor (see video below). The Exynos 4 has twice the processing capability of the older Exynos 4 Dual used in previous Galaxy phones, and it consumes 20% less power. To achieve this level of efficiency, Samsung has implemented on-off switching as well as dynamic voltage and frequency scaling for each core. All that means the processor will consume exactly the amount of power it needs under any given workload. -Source Mashable

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:: The Descriptive Camera doesn’t just take pictures, it describes images for you :: A picture can paint a thousand words. But isn’t it better if your camera can actually describe images for you? That is now possible with the Descriptive Camera. The camera is actually a prototype developed by Matt Richardson, a computer programmer and photographer rolled into one. He probably made the prototype for a Computational Camera class at the New York University where he is currently taking his Master’s Degree. According to the inventor, the Descriptive Camera works by snapping pictures first then sending those images to the Mechanical Turk of Amazon.Once it’s submitted to the Mechanical Turk, it will be processed there after which the results will be forwarded back to the camera within 6 minutes. A thermal printer then prints the description via text in the style of a Polaroid print. As crazy as it seems, we think that the camera will be extremely useful, especially to those who are visually impaired or blind. “I wanted to make something that could create descriptions instead of photos, but I think there is a lot of fun that can be had when you compare the output of the camera and what the description says,” Richardson said.

:: The Descriptive Camera doesn’t just take pictures, it describes images for you :: A picture can paint a thousand words. But isn’t it better if your camera can actually describe images for you? That is now possible with the Descriptive Camera. The camera is actually a prototype developed by Matt Richardson, a computer programmer and photographer rolled into one. He probably made the prototype for a Computational Camera class at the New York University where he is currently taking his Master’s Degree. According to the inventor, the Descriptive Camera works by snapping pictures first then sending those images to the Mechanical Turk of Amazon.Once it’s submitted to the Mechanical Turk, it will be processed there after which the results will be forwarded back to the camera within 6 minutes. A thermal printer then prints the description via text in the style of a Polaroid print. As crazy as it seems, we think that the camera will be extremely useful, especially to those who are visually impaired or blind. “I wanted to make something that could create descriptions instead of photos, but I think there is a lot of fun that can be had when you compare the output of the camera and what the description says,” Richardson said.

:: The Descriptive Camera doesn’t just take pictures, it describes images for you :: A picture can paint a thousand words. But isn’t it better if your camera can actually describe images for you? That is now possible with the Descriptive Camera. The camera is actually a prototype developed by Matt Richardson, a computer programmer and photographer rolled into one. He probably made the prototype for a Computational Camera class at the New York University where he is currently taking his Master’s Degree. According to the inventor, the Descriptive Camera works by snapping pictures first then sending those images to the Mechanical Turk of Amazon.Once it’s submitted to the Mechanical Turk, it will be processed there after which the results will be forwarded back to the camera within 6 minutes. A thermal printer then prints the description via text in the style of a Polaroid print. As crazy as it seems, we think that the camera will be extremely useful, especially to those who are visually impaired or blind. “I wanted to make something that could create descriptions instead of photos, but I think there is a lot of fun that can be had when you compare the output of the camera and what the description says,” Richardson said.

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