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We at CompuBrain are extremely elated to be part of one of the most comprehensive Cyber Security project under the auspices of the Gujarat Home Ministry. Spearheaded by honorable Chief Minister of Gujarat Shri Vijay Rupani, we take immense pride to have provided our technology expertise in the ambitious “Ashvast” project which is going to be the first-ever Cyber Crime prevention unit in India. This landmark initiative by the Cyber Cell of Gujarat will provide complete information of Cyber Frauds and Cyber Criminals to the state civilians. The portal - www.gujaratcybercrime.org - will host a database of the phone numbers, email addresses and names often used for Cyber Crimes also known as Online Frauds and Harassments. The project is slated to be launched by Union Home Minister Amit Shah today. #DigitalIndia #DigitalSafeIndia #Gujarat #CompuBrain

We at CompuBrain are extremely elated to be part of one of the most comprehensive Cyber Security project under the auspices of the Gujarat Home Ministry. Spearheaded by honorable Chief Minister of Gujarat Shri Vijay Rupani, we take immense pride to have provided our technology expertise in the ambitious “Ashvast” project which is going to be the first-ever Cyber Crime prevention unit in India. This landmark initiative by the Cyber Cell of Gujarat will provide complete information of Cyber Frauds and Cyber Criminals to the state civilians. The portal - www.gujaratcybercrime.org - will host a database of the phone numbers, email addresses and names often used for Cyber Crimes also known as Online Frauds and Harassments. The project is slated to be launched by Union Home Minister Amit Shah today. #DigitalIndia #DigitalSafeIndia #Gujarat #CompuBrain

We at CompuBrain are extremely elated to be part of one of the most comprehensive Cyber Security project under the auspices of the Gujarat Home Ministry. Spearheaded by honorable Chief Minister of Gujarat Shri Vijay Rupani, we take immense pride to have provided our technology expertise in the ambitious “Ashvast” project which is going to be the first-ever Cyber Crime prevention unit in India. This landmark initiative by the Cyber Cell of Gujarat will provide complete information of Cyber Frauds and Cyber Criminals to the state civilians. The portal - www.gujaratcybercrime.org - will host a database of the phone numbers, email addresses and names often used for Cyber Crimes also known as Online Frauds and Harassments. The project is slated to be launched by Union Home Minister Amit Shah today. #DigitalIndia #DigitalSafeIndia #Gujarat #CompuBrain

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Let the spirit of Christmas warm your home with love, joy and peace. #Christmas #MerryChristmas #Christmas2017 #Festival #Cheers #CompuBrain #Business #Technology #Innovations

Let the spirit of Christmas warm your home with love, joy and peace. #Christmas #MerryChristmas #Christmas2017 #Festival #Cheers #CompuBrain #Business #Technology #Innovations

Let the spirit of Christmas warm your home with love, joy and peace. #Christmas #MerryChristmas #Christmas2017 #Festival #Cheers #CompuBrain #Business #Technology #Innovations

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HUGVIE - A Human Pillow Mobile Phone Holder Engineers at the Advanced Telecommunications Research Institute International (ATR) said they worked on the principle that people feel closer to whomever they are speaking when two or more senses are engaged, such as hearing and touch. "Hugvie is a simple device that uses voice and tactile senses. It creates a strong sense that the user is hugging the other person, a feeling that cannot be attained via mobile phones," ATR and its collaborators Kyoto Nishikawa and industrial materials maker Toyobo said. And it actually is rooted in science: research has shown that physical contact with a simple, inanimate object decreased levels of cortisol, the hormone associated with stress. The Hugvie - a portmanteau of "hug" and the French word for "life" - measures 80 centimetres by 55 centimetres (31 inches by 21 inches), and will sell for 10,000 yen ($80) in Japan when it goes on sale in September.

HUGVIE - A Human Pillow Mobile Phone Holder Engineers at the Advanced Telecommunications Research Institute International (ATR) said they worked on the principle that people feel closer to whomever they are speaking when two or more senses are engaged, such as hearing and touch. "Hugvie is a simple device that uses voice and tactile senses. It creates a strong sense that the user is hugging the other person, a feeling that cannot be attained via mobile phones," ATR and its collaborators Kyoto Nishikawa and industrial materials maker Toyobo said. And it actually is rooted in science: research has shown that physical contact with a simple, inanimate object decreased levels of cortisol, the hormone associated with stress. The Hugvie - a portmanteau of "hug" and the French word for "life" - measures 80 centimetres by 55 centimetres (31 inches by 21 inches), and will sell for 10,000 yen ($80) in Japan when it goes on sale in September.

HUGVIE - A Human Pillow Mobile Phone Holder Engineers at the Advanced Telecommunications Research Institute International (ATR) said they worked on the principle that people feel closer to whomever they are speaking when two or more senses are engaged, such as hearing and touch. "Hugvie is a simple device that uses voice and tactile senses. It creates a strong sense that the user is hugging the other person, a feeling that cannot be attained via mobile phones," ATR and its collaborators Kyoto Nishikawa and industrial materials maker Toyobo said. And it actually is rooted in science: research has shown that physical contact with a simple, inanimate object decreased levels of cortisol, the hormone associated with stress. The Hugvie - a portmanteau of "hug" and the French word for "life" - measures 80 centimetres by 55 centimetres (31 inches by 21 inches), and will sell for 10,000 yen ($80) in Japan when it goes on sale in September.

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... Tizen OS -powered Samsung Z ... Samsung on Tuesday unwrapped its new smartphone using the Tizen platform, a move aimed at breaking away from Google`s Android and staking a claim to the "Internet of Things”. Samsung touted Tizen as a platform not just for phones, but for a range of connected devices from home appliances to door locks and watches which may communicate with one another in the future.

... Tizen OS -powered Samsung Z ... Samsung on Tuesday unwrapped its new smartphone using the Tizen platform, a move aimed at breaking away from Google`s Android and staking a claim to the "Internet of Things”. Samsung touted Tizen as a platform not just for phones, but for a range of connected devices from home appliances to door locks and watches which may communicate with one another in the future.

... Tizen OS -powered Samsung Z ... Samsung on Tuesday unwrapped its new smartphone using the Tizen platform, a move aimed at breaking away from Google`s Android and staking a claim to the "Internet of Things”. Samsung touted Tizen as a platform not just for phones, but for a range of connected devices from home appliances to door locks and watches which may communicate with one another in the future.

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... AVEGANT GLYPH HOME THEATER HEADSET ... The home theater headset just got a name, and the first prototype looked an awful lot like what you’d see underneath a Terminator cyborg’s smooth visage. As Oculus did before, the scrappy eight-person team at Avegant is taking its impressive proof-of-concept to Kickstarter in hopes of funding a beta unit: $500 is the base level for a Glyph, and the project is set to go live on January 22nd. And this sentence — right here! — is where we’re gonna stop speaking about the Glyph as if it’s competing with the Oculus Rift. As Avegant’s CEO Ed Tang told us late last week: “We’re not trying to compete with Oculus.”

... AVEGANT GLYPH HOME THEATER HEADSET ... The home theater headset just got a name, and the first prototype looked an awful lot like what you’d see underneath a Terminator cyborg’s smooth visage. As Oculus did before, the scrappy eight-person team at Avegant is taking its impressive proof-of-concept to Kickstarter in hopes of funding a beta unit: $500 is the base level for a Glyph, and the project is set to go live on January 22nd. And this sentence — right here! — is where we’re gonna stop speaking about the Glyph as if it’s competing with the Oculus Rift. As Avegant’s CEO Ed Tang told us late last week: “We’re not trying to compete with Oculus.”

... AVEGANT GLYPH HOME THEATER HEADSET ... The home theater headset just got a name, and the first prototype looked an awful lot like what you’d see underneath a Terminator cyborg’s smooth visage. As Oculus did before, the scrappy eight-person team at Avegant is taking its impressive proof-of-concept to Kickstarter in hopes of funding a beta unit: $500 is the base level for a Glyph, and the project is set to go live on January 22nd. And this sentence — right here! — is where we’re gonna stop speaking about the Glyph as if it’s competing with the Oculus Rift. As Avegant’s CEO Ed Tang told us late last week: “We’re not trying to compete with Oculus.”

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... Smart Phones for Homework ... Not just 4 texting: 1 in 3 middle-schoolers uses smart phones for homework. A new survey by the Verizon Foundation finds that middle-schoolers, across income levels, are using mobile apps to learn math, do 'virtual' labs, and collaborate with peers on projects. Students use an education app on a tablet at the Bronx Academy of Promise in New York, where Verizon Foundation on Nov. 28 announced national survey results that show that middle-school students use mobile technology to do homework.

... Smart Phones for Homework ... Not just 4 texting: 1 in 3 middle-schoolers uses smart phones for homework. A new survey by the Verizon Foundation finds that middle-schoolers, across income levels, are using mobile apps to learn math, do 'virtual' labs, and collaborate with peers on projects. Students use an education app on a tablet at the Bronx Academy of Promise in New York, where Verizon Foundation on Nov. 28 announced national survey results that show that middle-school students use mobile technology to do homework.

... Smart Phones for Homework ... Not just 4 texting: 1 in 3 middle-schoolers uses smart phones for homework. A new survey by the Verizon Foundation finds that middle-schoolers, across income levels, are using mobile apps to learn math, do 'virtual' labs, and collaborate with peers on projects. Students use an education app on a tablet at the Bronx Academy of Promise in New York, where Verizon Foundation on Nov. 28 announced national survey results that show that middle-school students use mobile technology to do homework.

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#Didyouknow - The prime reason the Google home page is so bare is due to the fact that the founders didn't know HTML and just wanted a quick interface. In fact it was noted that the submit button was a long time coming and hitting the RETURN key was the only way to burst Google into life.

#Didyouknow - The prime reason the Google home page is so bare is due to the fact that the founders didn't know HTML and just wanted a quick interface. In fact it was noted that the submit button was a long time coming and hitting the RETURN key was the only way to burst Google into life.

#Didyouknow - The prime reason the Google home page is so bare is due to the fact that the founders didn't know HTML and just wanted a quick interface. In fact it was noted that the submit button was a long time coming and hitting the RETURN key was the only way to burst Google into life.

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... 3D printing artificial limbs and biomaterials goes mainstream ... We have already seen some great examples when artificial limbs and different types of biomaterials such as kidney or heart tissues were printed out in 3D but in 2014 this industry becomes mainstream with the first home 3D printers in the market.

... 3D printing artificial limbs and biomaterials goes mainstream ... We have already seen some great examples when artificial limbs and different types of biomaterials such as kidney or heart tissues were printed out in 3D but in 2014 this industry becomes mainstream with the first home 3D printers in the market.

... 3D printing artificial limbs and biomaterials goes mainstream ... We have already seen some great examples when artificial limbs and different types of biomaterials such as kidney or heart tissues were printed out in 3D but in 2014 this industry becomes mainstream with the first home 3D printers in the market.

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... Indian born entrepreneur’s smart watch will save lives and transform healthcare ... Jyotsna Desai, a promising scientist based in Gujarat, was in a major dilemma. She had just received a letter from a major R&D firm based in the USA offering her the opportunity to work on a futuristic technology that would propel her career to new heights. Not only was the R&D firm willing to sponsor her research, it was even willing to offer her a joint patent if her research was successful. While Jyotsna would have been normally excited by this opportunity, she was confused because of the health of her aged parents. Some thoughts quickly raced through her head, “Who would remind her diabetic mother to regularly check her sugar levels? How would she ensure that her father who had already suffered one heart attack was taking medications on time?” Jyotsna’s dilemma is similar to many young professionals who have their aged parents at home, and have no way to monitor the health or understand if their parents are safe. This was exactly the situation that inspired and prompted Raj Sadhu, Founder, Vyzin to create a smart watch, called VESAG that can remotely transmit key health parameters via existing cellular networks to a central server.

... Indian born entrepreneur’s smart watch will save lives and transform healthcare ... Jyotsna Desai, a promising scientist based in Gujarat, was in a major dilemma. She had just received a letter from a major R&D firm based in the USA offering her the opportunity to work on a futuristic technology that would propel her career to new heights. Not only was the R&D firm willing to sponsor her research, it was even willing to offer her a joint patent if her research was successful. While Jyotsna would have been normally excited by this opportunity, she was confused because of the health of her aged parents. Some thoughts quickly raced through her head, “Who would remind her diabetic mother to regularly check her sugar levels? How would she ensure that her father who had already suffered one heart attack was taking medications on time?” Jyotsna’s dilemma is similar to many young professionals who have their aged parents at home, and have no way to monitor the health or understand if their parents are safe. This was exactly the situation that inspired and prompted Raj Sadhu, Founder, Vyzin to create a smart watch, called VESAG that can remotely transmit key health parameters via existing cellular networks to a central server.

... Indian born entrepreneur’s smart watch will save lives and transform healthcare ... Jyotsna Desai, a promising scientist based in Gujarat, was in a major dilemma. She had just received a letter from a major R&D firm based in the USA offering her the opportunity to work on a futuristic technology that would propel her career to new heights. Not only was the R&D firm willing to sponsor her research, it was even willing to offer her a joint patent if her research was successful. While Jyotsna would have been normally excited by this opportunity, she was confused because of the health of her aged parents. Some thoughts quickly raced through her head, “Who would remind her diabetic mother to regularly check her sugar levels? How would she ensure that her father who had already suffered one heart attack was taking medications on time?” Jyotsna’s dilemma is similar to many young professionals who have their aged parents at home, and have no way to monitor the health or understand if their parents are safe. This was exactly the situation that inspired and prompted Raj Sadhu, Founder, Vyzin to create a smart watch, called VESAG that can remotely transmit key health parameters via existing cellular networks to a central server.

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Firefox OS for Mobile device is coming.. Originally introduced as the Boot2Gecko (B2G) project, Firefox OS is a next-generation operating system that is describes as “magical”. This platform has the potential to break the mobile OS space open. Firefox OS is far from the screenshots in the blog post. The graphics are cleaner and based from a video of a Firefox OS demo, the interaction is smoother and tighter. The way it is shaping up, the Mobile OS as we know it is on its was to be “webified,” ie, folks who know how to code using HTML, CSS, and JavaScript can make full-fledged apps. Because Firefox OS is constructed using HTML, JavaScript and CSS it means you only need basic Web development skills to reach in and completely change the device experience. You could literally change one line of CSS and completely change the way the icons on the homescreen look, or re-write some core JavaScript files that handle phone-calls. Folks in Brazil will get to see a mass-market release of affordable phones (not iPhone-level for sure) with Firefox OS via Telefonica, and this will be a testbed for how this new OS will be deployed commercially. Hacker-types can of course download Firefox OS and install an instance on their phones (Android phones most likely) and even already write apps. Let’s see how Firefox OS will progress in the next few months.

Firefox OS for Mobile device is coming.. Originally introduced as the Boot2Gecko (B2G) project, Firefox OS is a next-generation operating system that is describes as “magical”. This platform has the potential to break the mobile OS space open. Firefox OS is far from the screenshots in the blog post. The graphics are cleaner and based from a video of a Firefox OS demo, the interaction is smoother and tighter. The way it is shaping up, the Mobile OS as we know it is on its was to be “webified,” ie, folks who know how to code using HTML, CSS, and JavaScript can make full-fledged apps. Because Firefox OS is constructed using HTML, JavaScript and CSS it means you only need basic Web development skills to reach in and completely change the device experience. You could literally change one line of CSS and completely change the way the icons on the homescreen look, or re-write some core JavaScript files that handle phone-calls. Folks in Brazil will get to see a mass-market release of affordable phones (not iPhone-level for sure) with Firefox OS via Telefonica, and this will be a testbed for how this new OS will be deployed commercially. Hacker-types can of course download Firefox OS and install an instance on their phones (Android phones most likely) and even already write apps. Let’s see how Firefox OS will progress in the next few months.

Firefox OS for Mobile device is coming.. Originally introduced as the Boot2Gecko (B2G) project, Firefox OS is a next-generation operating system that is describes as “magical”. This platform has the potential to break the mobile OS space open. Firefox OS is far from the screenshots in the blog post. The graphics are cleaner and based from a video of a Firefox OS demo, the interaction is smoother and tighter. The way it is shaping up, the Mobile OS as we know it is on its was to be “webified,” ie, folks who know how to code using HTML, CSS, and JavaScript can make full-fledged apps. Because Firefox OS is constructed using HTML, JavaScript and CSS it means you only need basic Web development skills to reach in and completely change the device experience. You could literally change one line of CSS and completely change the way the icons on the homescreen look, or re-write some core JavaScript files that handle phone-calls. Folks in Brazil will get to see a mass-market release of affordable phones (not iPhone-level for sure) with Firefox OS via Telefonica, and this will be a testbed for how this new OS will be deployed commercially. Hacker-types can of course download Firefox OS and install an instance on their phones (Android phones most likely) and even already write apps. Let’s see how Firefox OS will progress in the next few months.

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2013 Invention Awards: Ballast Bulb A household lamp powered by a bag of rocks. More than 780 million people rely on kerosene to light their homes. But the fuel is pricey and is toxic when burned—not to mention a fire hazard. In 2008, London-based product designer Martin Riddiford and his colleague Jim Reeves decided to create a cheap, safe alternative. Riddiford knew a falling weight could produce enough energy to run a grandfather clock, so why not a light? To find out, he attached the crank of a wind-up flashlight to a bicycle wheel. He hung a weight from the wheel to cause it to spin; the wheel cranked the flashlight, and the device lit up. Over the next four years, Riddiford, Reeves, and a small team spent their downtime between projects in a basement, refining the GravityLight. To use it, a person hangs the device and fills an attached fabric bag with up to 28 pounds of rocks, dirt, or other material. Lifting and releasing the bag steadily pulls a notched belt through GravityLight’s plastic hub; the belt spins a series of gears to drive a small motor, which continuously powers an LED for about 30 minutes. The team used crowdfunding to manufacture 1,000 GravityLights, which it plans to send to developing countries for field testing—plus 6,000 more for backers. “It’s exciting to witness so much positive reaction to what we’re doing,” Riddiford says. Besides remote villages, the lamp could prove handy in campsites, closets, and any dark nook far from a socket, so Riddiford also hopes to license a retail version for less than $10. GravityLight: Graham Murdoch HOW IT WORKS 1) As a weighted bag descends, it tugs a belt to turn a series of plastic gears. 2) The gears work in unison to spin an electric motor. 3) The motor powers a small yet bright LED, providing continuous illumination for about 30 minutes—the maximum amount of time that the bag can take to descend. 4) External connectors can power low-voltage devices, and the entire system is designed to work for thousands of lift-and-drop cycles. INVENTORS : Jim Reeves, Martin Riddiford COMPANY : Therefore INVENTION : GravityLight

2013 Invention Awards: Ballast Bulb A household lamp powered by a bag of rocks. More than 780 million people rely on kerosene to light their homes. But the fuel is pricey and is toxic when burned—not to mention a fire hazard. In 2008, London-based product designer Martin Riddiford and his colleague Jim Reeves decided to create a cheap, safe alternative. Riddiford knew a falling weight could produce enough energy to run a grandfather clock, so why not a light? To find out, he attached the crank of a wind-up flashlight to a bicycle wheel. He hung a weight from the wheel to cause it to spin; the wheel cranked the flashlight, and the device lit up. Over the next four years, Riddiford, Reeves, and a small team spent their downtime between projects in a basement, refining the GravityLight. To use it, a person hangs the device and fills an attached fabric bag with up to 28 pounds of rocks, dirt, or other material. Lifting and releasing the bag steadily pulls a notched belt through GravityLight’s plastic hub; the belt spins a series of gears to drive a small motor, which continuously powers an LED for about 30 minutes. The team used crowdfunding to manufacture 1,000 GravityLights, which it plans to send to developing countries for field testing—plus 6,000 more for backers. “It’s exciting to witness so much positive reaction to what we’re doing,” Riddiford says. Besides remote villages, the lamp could prove handy in campsites, closets, and any dark nook far from a socket, so Riddiford also hopes to license a retail version for less than $10. GravityLight: Graham Murdoch HOW IT WORKS 1) As a weighted bag descends, it tugs a belt to turn a series of plastic gears. 2) The gears work in unison to spin an electric motor. 3) The motor powers a small yet bright LED, providing continuous illumination for about 30 minutes—the maximum amount of time that the bag can take to descend. 4) External connectors can power low-voltage devices, and the entire system is designed to work for thousands of lift-and-drop cycles. INVENTORS : Jim Reeves, Martin Riddiford COMPANY : Therefore INVENTION : GravityLight

2013 Invention Awards: Ballast Bulb A household lamp powered by a bag of rocks. More than 780 million people rely on kerosene to light their homes. But the fuel is pricey and is toxic when burned—not to mention a fire hazard. In 2008, London-based product designer Martin Riddiford and his colleague Jim Reeves decided to create a cheap, safe alternative. Riddiford knew a falling weight could produce enough energy to run a grandfather clock, so why not a light? To find out, he attached the crank of a wind-up flashlight to a bicycle wheel. He hung a weight from the wheel to cause it to spin; the wheel cranked the flashlight, and the device lit up. Over the next four years, Riddiford, Reeves, and a small team spent their downtime between projects in a basement, refining the GravityLight. To use it, a person hangs the device and fills an attached fabric bag with up to 28 pounds of rocks, dirt, or other material. Lifting and releasing the bag steadily pulls a notched belt through GravityLight’s plastic hub; the belt spins a series of gears to drive a small motor, which continuously powers an LED for about 30 minutes. The team used crowdfunding to manufacture 1,000 GravityLights, which it plans to send to developing countries for field testing—plus 6,000 more for backers. “It’s exciting to witness so much positive reaction to what we’re doing,” Riddiford says. Besides remote villages, the lamp could prove handy in campsites, closets, and any dark nook far from a socket, so Riddiford also hopes to license a retail version for less than $10. GravityLight: Graham Murdoch HOW IT WORKS 1) As a weighted bag descends, it tugs a belt to turn a series of plastic gears. 2) The gears work in unison to spin an electric motor. 3) The motor powers a small yet bright LED, providing continuous illumination for about 30 minutes—the maximum amount of time that the bag can take to descend. 4) External connectors can power low-voltage devices, and the entire system is designed to work for thousands of lift-and-drop cycles. INVENTORS : Jim Reeves, Martin Riddiford COMPANY : Therefore INVENTION : GravityLight

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