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#TechNews: Introduced the ability to request and send money via Gmail. The ability that was first only available on Web, has now arrived on the Android app as well. User can now tap on the Attachment button in the Gmail for Android app, and click on the Send Money option to transfer money easily using the Google Wallet. #Business #Technology #Innovations #Gmail #MoneyTransfer

#TechNews: Introduced the ability to request and send money via Gmail. The ability that was first only available on Web, has now arrived on the Android app as well. User can now tap on the Attachment button in the Gmail for Android app, and click on the Send Money option to transfer money easily using the Google Wallet. #Business #Technology #Innovations #Gmail #MoneyTransfer

#TechNews: Introduced the ability to request and send money via Gmail. The ability that was first only available on Web, has now arrived on the Android app as well. User can now tap on the Attachment button in the Gmail for Android app, and click on the Send Money option to transfer money easily using the Google Wallet. #Business #Technology #Innovations #Gmail #MoneyTransfer

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... Microsoft patent reveals possible gaming future ... Microsoft has filed a patent for a console which could transform the walls of a living room into a 360 degree gaming experience. The patent, for an "immersive display experience", was filed by Microsoft early last year but only published by the US Patent and Trademark Office this week.

... Microsoft patent reveals possible gaming future ... Microsoft has filed a patent for a console which could transform the walls of a living room into a 360 degree gaming experience. The patent, for an "immersive display experience", was filed by Microsoft early last year but only published by the US Patent and Trademark Office this week.

... Microsoft patent reveals possible gaming future ... Microsoft has filed a patent for a console which could transform the walls of a living room into a 360 degree gaming experience. The patent, for an "immersive display experience", was filed by Microsoft early last year but only published by the US Patent and Trademark Office this week.

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Password Pill Vitamin authentication – Password Pill when swallowed turns you into verification token for security Just like some other interesting technologies that we have seen in the recent few months this one by Motorola really captures your imagination. Revealed at the D11 conference by Regina Dugan, SVP for advanced technology and projects Motorola, the secretly coded swallowable password/computer pill by Proteus Digital Health makes a human being into an authentication token. Once you swallow the pill it reacts with the acids in the stomach to make an 18-bit code which the company tags as vitamin authentication and is approved by the FDA. Once the code is generate the signal is transmitted to the authentication device which is a very interesting way of authentication for high security applications. This new technology can have immense applications as it can be used as a very authentic and full-proof security method to prevent any unwanted access to vulnerable systems. Watch more : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Etdk3_t7_FE

Password Pill Vitamin authentication – Password Pill when swallowed turns you into verification token for security Just like some other interesting technologies that we have seen in the recent few months this one by Motorola really captures your imagination. Revealed at the D11 conference by Regina Dugan, SVP for advanced technology and projects Motorola, the secretly coded swallowable password/computer pill by Proteus Digital Health makes a human being into an authentication token. Once you swallow the pill it reacts with the acids in the stomach to make an 18-bit code which the company tags as vitamin authentication and is approved by the FDA. Once the code is generate the signal is transmitted to the authentication device which is a very interesting way of authentication for high security applications. This new technology can have immense applications as it can be used as a very authentic and full-proof security method to prevent any unwanted access to vulnerable systems. Watch more : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Etdk3_t7_FE

Password Pill Vitamin authentication – Password Pill when swallowed turns you into verification token for security Just like some other interesting technologies that we have seen in the recent few months this one by Motorola really captures your imagination. Revealed at the D11 conference by Regina Dugan, SVP for advanced technology and projects Motorola, the secretly coded swallowable password/computer pill by Proteus Digital Health makes a human being into an authentication token. Once you swallow the pill it reacts with the acids in the stomach to make an 18-bit code which the company tags as vitamin authentication and is approved by the FDA. Once the code is generate the signal is transmitted to the authentication device which is a very interesting way of authentication for high security applications. This new technology can have immense applications as it can be used as a very authentic and full-proof security method to prevent any unwanted access to vulnerable systems. Watch more : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Etdk3_t7_FE

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EIGHT devices in one! Lucid Design has come up with something that we are generally accustomed to think of as some extraterrestrial tech or some Sci-Fi movie flick. LifeHub by Lucid Design is in its truest sense, the confluence of multiple technologies that marks the beginning of a new era and annihilates many other technologies. Amazingly, this one compact gadget boasts the abilities of seven different devices. LifeHub includes eight, yes EIGHT, devices in one! A projector, a Bluetooth speaker, a wallet, a key, a headset, a smartphone and a watch in one! Your desire to own LifeHub will be greater than your desire to own an iPhone!

EIGHT devices in one! Lucid Design has come up with something that we are generally accustomed to think of as some extraterrestrial tech or some Sci-Fi movie flick. LifeHub by Lucid Design is in its truest sense, the confluence of multiple technologies that marks the beginning of a new era and annihilates many other technologies. Amazingly, this one compact gadget boasts the abilities of seven different devices. LifeHub includes eight, yes EIGHT, devices in one! A projector, a Bluetooth speaker, a wallet, a key, a headset, a smartphone and a watch in one! Your desire to own LifeHub will be greater than your desire to own an iPhone!

EIGHT devices in one! Lucid Design has come up with something that we are generally accustomed to think of as some extraterrestrial tech or some Sci-Fi movie flick. LifeHub by Lucid Design is in its truest sense, the confluence of multiple technologies that marks the beginning of a new era and annihilates many other technologies. Amazingly, this one compact gadget boasts the abilities of seven different devices. LifeHub includes eight, yes EIGHT, devices in one! A projector, a Bluetooth speaker, a wallet, a key, a headset, a smartphone and a watch in one! Your desire to own LifeHub will be greater than your desire to own an iPhone!

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:: KudoCase will keep your iPad charged via solar energy :: If you’ve always wanted an iPad case that could power your device using solar energy, the folks at Wireless NRG have released a solar-powered iPad case dubbed the KudoCase. If the accompanying image above did not already give it away, the KudoCase is a case for the iPad that comes with solar panels installed on the front. The solar panels will then be able to store energy from both indoor and outdoor light sources which in turn will charge the case’s built-in battery. The battery is then used to power your iPad. Assuming you are able to constantly charge the case itself, in theory we guess you’d never have to plug your iPad into a wall socket or to your computer if you wish to charge the device. Alternatively the case also comes with a USB port that you can use to charge another device (like your iPhone) by plugging in the USB cable.

:: KudoCase will keep your iPad charged via solar energy :: If you’ve always wanted an iPad case that could power your device using solar energy, the folks at Wireless NRG have released a solar-powered iPad case dubbed the KudoCase. If the accompanying image above did not already give it away, the KudoCase is a case for the iPad that comes with solar panels installed on the front. The solar panels will then be able to store energy from both indoor and outdoor light sources which in turn will charge the case’s built-in battery. The battery is then used to power your iPad. Assuming you are able to constantly charge the case itself, in theory we guess you’d never have to plug your iPad into a wall socket or to your computer if you wish to charge the device. Alternatively the case also comes with a USB port that you can use to charge another device (like your iPhone) by plugging in the USB cable.

:: KudoCase will keep your iPad charged via solar energy :: If you’ve always wanted an iPad case that could power your device using solar energy, the folks at Wireless NRG have released a solar-powered iPad case dubbed the KudoCase. If the accompanying image above did not already give it away, the KudoCase is a case for the iPad that comes with solar panels installed on the front. The solar panels will then be able to store energy from both indoor and outdoor light sources which in turn will charge the case’s built-in battery. The battery is then used to power your iPad. Assuming you are able to constantly charge the case itself, in theory we guess you’d never have to plug your iPad into a wall socket or to your computer if you wish to charge the device. Alternatively the case also comes with a USB port that you can use to charge another device (like your iPhone) by plugging in the USB cable.

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:: How Google's Drive helps kill Microsoft's Office :: This is how a search company can steal the productivity business: By storing work, not helping users edit it. Google's hard drive in the sky, Google Drive, is a big threat to other cloud storage products like Dropbox and Box. But it's also a stab straight at the heart of Microsoft's mainstream business software, Microsoft Office. While Google's productivity application suites, Docs (now incorporated into Drive) and Apps (for businesses), have been making some headway into Microsoft Office's territory, the important battlefield is not the application. It's the data. If Google can move the battlefield to a place where it has the bigger army and better weapons, the whole game changes. Google Drive might make that happen. Let's look at the world from behind Google-colored glasses. Every time a user performs a search in the Google search engine, or clicks a link in Chrome, or +1s an item in Plus, Google adds an atom of data to its knowledge of what people like and what they do. This information helps Google index the Web and rank its results when people are searching for something. This is also the Facebook model, by the way. Moreover, every action that generates user data that doesn't touch down in a Google product or service deprives Google of information that it could otherwise use to index and understand the Web of human knowledge and preference. Microsoft Word documents stored on PCs? In the most uncharitable view, every one is money being stolen from Google. All closed, siloed apps, for that matter, remove opportunity from Google. Co-founder Sergey Brin has recently spoken out against apps and companies that wall off data from the open Internet. There is indeed a danger, but it's not just about openness, it's about Google's own ability to index the data. Back to Google Drive: By acting as the substrate for user data -- in other words, the file system -- Google gets exposed to many times more information. Google doesn't need, and in fact has no reason, to make this data public, but having it available to index and cross-reference does make the company's core service, targeted advertising, more valuable. The more data Google has, the more valuable its product becomes. And that product, in case it's not already clear, is you. Your attention, which is sold to advertisers. Microsoft's main product, meanwhile, is software, not data. (And its customers aren't advertisers, but people who buy software.) So why can't Microsoft's model and Google's live in harmony? Because Microsoft's software suite consists of application software and an operating system, and the operating system stores user data, and the data is what Google wants. So Google is undermining that function with Google Drive, and not just by offering a synchronized file system (which, by the way, Microsoft also offers). Once users put their data in Google Drive, they will also find out how easy it is to open these files in non-Microsoft apps. This is one of the reasons Google is launching Google Drive with an API for developers and a suite of partner products that shave off Microsoft customers a bit at a time. One of the most important features that third-party developers are using with Google Drive is the "Open with" feature. If you upload a Microsoft Project file to Drive, for example, you can open it with the Web app SmartSheet, directly on the Web. Similarly, Web apps like SlideRocket can open PowerPoint files. Google's own productivity apps can also open Microsoft files. The more people realize that they don't need Office to access their archives of files from the pre-Google Drive era, the more likely they are to look to Google Drive (or perhaps competing products, if they have similar partners) as primary storage. And Google wins, while Microsoft loses. How can Microsoft counter this market erosion at Google's hands? The company has its own cloud storage product and a strong history with developers. And it has the business customers. But according to a Google Drive developer I spoke with, one who's been dealing also with Microsoft for years, Microsoft is not there yet. It has the centralized storage in SkyDrive and Office 365, but not the infrastructure -- especially the identity and sign-on tools -- that developers need to integrate into the Microsoft cloud. Microsoft also needs to protect its software licensing revenue for Office. Google, the upstart in business software, can undercut Microsoft's prices since all its software sales are incremental on top of its search and advertising businesses. Other companies realize that whoever controls the data controls the market. Box, for instance, just launched OneCloud, which lets you open documents in a variety of apps. It's mobile-only so far, though. It is no longer a PC world, and because of that Microsoft doesn't own the world of work. People do their jobs on their own computers, on the Web, and on mobile devices; and they expect their work to follow them onto whatever hardware they're using. Every major technology company understands this. But only a few have the products, the infrastructure, and the freedom to get ahead of the shift.

:: How Google's Drive helps kill Microsoft's Office :: This is how a search company can steal the productivity business: By storing work, not helping users edit it. Google's hard drive in the sky, Google Drive, is a big threat to other cloud storage products like Dropbox and Box. But it's also a stab straight at the heart of Microsoft's mainstream business software, Microsoft Office. While Google's productivity application suites, Docs (now incorporated into Drive) and Apps (for businesses), have been making some headway into Microsoft Office's territory, the important battlefield is not the application. It's the data. If Google can move the battlefield to a place where it has the bigger army and better weapons, the whole game changes. Google Drive might make that happen. Let's look at the world from behind Google-colored glasses. Every time a user performs a search in the Google search engine, or clicks a link in Chrome, or +1s an item in Plus, Google adds an atom of data to its knowledge of what people like and what they do. This information helps Google index the Web and rank its results when people are searching for something. This is also the Facebook model, by the way. Moreover, every action that generates user data that doesn't touch down in a Google product or service deprives Google of information that it could otherwise use to index and understand the Web of human knowledge and preference. Microsoft Word documents stored on PCs? In the most uncharitable view, every one is money being stolen from Google. All closed, siloed apps, for that matter, remove opportunity from Google. Co-founder Sergey Brin has recently spoken out against apps and companies that wall off data from the open Internet. There is indeed a danger, but it's not just about openness, it's about Google's own ability to index the data. Back to Google Drive: By acting as the substrate for user data -- in other words, the file system -- Google gets exposed to many times more information. Google doesn't need, and in fact has no reason, to make this data public, but having it available to index and cross-reference does make the company's core service, targeted advertising, more valuable. The more data Google has, the more valuable its product becomes. And that product, in case it's not already clear, is you. Your attention, which is sold to advertisers. Microsoft's main product, meanwhile, is software, not data. (And its customers aren't advertisers, but people who buy software.) So why can't Microsoft's model and Google's live in harmony? Because Microsoft's software suite consists of application software and an operating system, and the operating system stores user data, and the data is what Google wants. So Google is undermining that function with Google Drive, and not just by offering a synchronized file system (which, by the way, Microsoft also offers). Once users put their data in Google Drive, they will also find out how easy it is to open these files in non-Microsoft apps. This is one of the reasons Google is launching Google Drive with an API for developers and a suite of partner products that shave off Microsoft customers a bit at a time. One of the most important features that third-party developers are using with Google Drive is the "Open with" feature. If you upload a Microsoft Project file to Drive, for example, you can open it with the Web app SmartSheet, directly on the Web. Similarly, Web apps like SlideRocket can open PowerPoint files. Google's own productivity apps can also open Microsoft files. The more people realize that they don't need Office to access their archives of files from the pre-Google Drive era, the more likely they are to look to Google Drive (or perhaps competing products, if they have similar partners) as primary storage. And Google wins, while Microsoft loses. How can Microsoft counter this market erosion at Google's hands? The company has its own cloud storage product and a strong history with developers. And it has the business customers. But according to a Google Drive developer I spoke with, one who's been dealing also with Microsoft for years, Microsoft is not there yet. It has the centralized storage in SkyDrive and Office 365, but not the infrastructure -- especially the identity and sign-on tools -- that developers need to integrate into the Microsoft cloud. Microsoft also needs to protect its software licensing revenue for Office. Google, the upstart in business software, can undercut Microsoft's prices since all its software sales are incremental on top of its search and advertising businesses. Other companies realize that whoever controls the data controls the market. Box, for instance, just launched OneCloud, which lets you open documents in a variety of apps. It's mobile-only so far, though. It is no longer a PC world, and because of that Microsoft doesn't own the world of work. People do their jobs on their own computers, on the Web, and on mobile devices; and they expect their work to follow them onto whatever hardware they're using. Every major technology company understands this. But only a few have the products, the infrastructure, and the freedom to get ahead of the shift.

:: How Google's Drive helps kill Microsoft's Office :: This is how a search company can steal the productivity business: By storing work, not helping users edit it. Google's hard drive in the sky, Google Drive, is a big threat to other cloud storage products like Dropbox and Box. But it's also a stab straight at the heart of Microsoft's mainstream business software, Microsoft Office. While Google's productivity application suites, Docs (now incorporated into Drive) and Apps (for businesses), have been making some headway into Microsoft Office's territory, the important battlefield is not the application. It's the data. If Google can move the battlefield to a place where it has the bigger army and better weapons, the whole game changes. Google Drive might make that happen. Let's look at the world from behind Google-colored glasses. Every time a user performs a search in the Google search engine, or clicks a link in Chrome, or +1s an item in Plus, Google adds an atom of data to its knowledge of what people like and what they do. This information helps Google index the Web and rank its results when people are searching for something. This is also the Facebook model, by the way. Moreover, every action that generates user data that doesn't touch down in a Google product or service deprives Google of information that it could otherwise use to index and understand the Web of human knowledge and preference. Microsoft Word documents stored on PCs? In the most uncharitable view, every one is money being stolen from Google. All closed, siloed apps, for that matter, remove opportunity from Google. Co-founder Sergey Brin has recently spoken out against apps and companies that wall off data from the open Internet. There is indeed a danger, but it's not just about openness, it's about Google's own ability to index the data. Back to Google Drive: By acting as the substrate for user data -- in other words, the file system -- Google gets exposed to many times more information. Google doesn't need, and in fact has no reason, to make this data public, but having it available to index and cross-reference does make the company's core service, targeted advertising, more valuable. The more data Google has, the more valuable its product becomes. And that product, in case it's not already clear, is you. Your attention, which is sold to advertisers. Microsoft's main product, meanwhile, is software, not data. (And its customers aren't advertisers, but people who buy software.) So why can't Microsoft's model and Google's live in harmony? Because Microsoft's software suite consists of application software and an operating system, and the operating system stores user data, and the data is what Google wants. So Google is undermining that function with Google Drive, and not just by offering a synchronized file system (which, by the way, Microsoft also offers). Once users put their data in Google Drive, they will also find out how easy it is to open these files in non-Microsoft apps. This is one of the reasons Google is launching Google Drive with an API for developers and a suite of partner products that shave off Microsoft customers a bit at a time. One of the most important features that third-party developers are using with Google Drive is the "Open with" feature. If you upload a Microsoft Project file to Drive, for example, you can open it with the Web app SmartSheet, directly on the Web. Similarly, Web apps like SlideRocket can open PowerPoint files. Google's own productivity apps can also open Microsoft files. The more people realize that they don't need Office to access their archives of files from the pre-Google Drive era, the more likely they are to look to Google Drive (or perhaps competing products, if they have similar partners) as primary storage. And Google wins, while Microsoft loses. How can Microsoft counter this market erosion at Google's hands? The company has its own cloud storage product and a strong history with developers. And it has the business customers. But according to a Google Drive developer I spoke with, one who's been dealing also with Microsoft for years, Microsoft is not there yet. It has the centralized storage in SkyDrive and Office 365, but not the infrastructure -- especially the identity and sign-on tools -- that developers need to integrate into the Microsoft cloud. Microsoft also needs to protect its software licensing revenue for Office. Google, the upstart in business software, can undercut Microsoft's prices since all its software sales are incremental on top of its search and advertising businesses. Other companies realize that whoever controls the data controls the market. Box, for instance, just launched OneCloud, which lets you open documents in a variety of apps. It's mobile-only so far, though. It is no longer a PC world, and because of that Microsoft doesn't own the world of work. People do their jobs on their own computers, on the Web, and on mobile devices; and they expect their work to follow them onto whatever hardware they're using. Every major technology company understands this. But only a few have the products, the infrastructure, and the freedom to get ahead of the shift.

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Google co-founder Sergey Brin is worried about the future of the internet. There are “very powerful forces that have lined up against the open internet on all sides and around the world,” he said in an interview with The Guardian. According to Brin, one of the biggest threats to the openness of the internet is pressure from governments, which are trying to control the information flow on the internet. The overzealous entertainment industry, which is trying to end piracy, is another threat, and walled gardens raised by companies such as Facebook and Apple, which control what software can be released on their platforms, is equally dangerous, claims Brin. “I am more worried than I have been in the past. It’s scary,” he said. Brin specifically targets Facebook for its unwillingness to share its users’ data with others, claiming it would be impossible to create a company like Google if the internet was dominated by Facebook. “You have to play by their rules, which are really restrictive,” he said. Brin is directly criticizing Google’s competitors here, but he’s in a unique position. On one hand, Google famously pulled out most of its operations in China in the name of free speech in January 2010. Furthemore, Google’s Android mobile platform is open-source, in contrast of Apple’s closed and proprietary iOS platform. On the other, Google itself has often been criticized due to privacy concerns, which prompted the company to release a new, unified privacy policy in February 2012. Google owns a lot of private data about its users, and has at times been forced to hand it to the U.S. authorities. “We do everything possible to protect the data. If we could wave a magic wand and not be subject to US law, that would be great. If we could be in some magical jurisdiction that everyone in the world trusted, that would be great … We’re doing it as well as can be done,” claims Brin. What do you think: Is Google one of those “powerful forces” lined up against the open internet, or is it one of the good guys? Or is the truth somewhere in between? Share your opinions in the comments. -Source: Mashable

Google co-founder Sergey Brin is worried about the future of the internet. There are “very powerful forces that have lined up against the open internet on all sides and around the world,” he said in an interview with The Guardian. According to Brin, one of the biggest threats to the openness of the internet is pressure from governments, which are trying to control the information flow on the internet. The overzealous entertainment industry, which is trying to end piracy, is another threat, and walled gardens raised by companies such as Facebook and Apple, which control what software can be released on their platforms, is equally dangerous, claims Brin. “I am more worried than I have been in the past. It’s scary,” he said. Brin specifically targets Facebook for its unwillingness to share its users’ data with others, claiming it would be impossible to create a company like Google if the internet was dominated by Facebook. “You have to play by their rules, which are really restrictive,” he said. Brin is directly criticizing Google’s competitors here, but he’s in a unique position. On one hand, Google famously pulled out most of its operations in China in the name of free speech in January 2010. Furthemore, Google’s Android mobile platform is open-source, in contrast of Apple’s closed and proprietary iOS platform. On the other, Google itself has often been criticized due to privacy concerns, which prompted the company to release a new, unified privacy policy in February 2012. Google owns a lot of private data about its users, and has at times been forced to hand it to the U.S. authorities. “We do everything possible to protect the data. If we could wave a magic wand and not be subject to US law, that would be great. If we could be in some magical jurisdiction that everyone in the world trusted, that would be great … We’re doing it as well as can be done,” claims Brin. What do you think: Is Google one of those “powerful forces” lined up against the open internet, or is it one of the good guys? Or is the truth somewhere in between? Share your opinions in the comments. -Source: Mashable

Google co-founder Sergey Brin is worried about the future of the internet. There are “very powerful forces that have lined up against the open internet on all sides and around the world,” he said in an interview with The Guardian. According to Brin, one of the biggest threats to the openness of the internet is pressure from governments, which are trying to control the information flow on the internet. The overzealous entertainment industry, which is trying to end piracy, is another threat, and walled gardens raised by companies such as Facebook and Apple, which control what software can be released on their platforms, is equally dangerous, claims Brin. “I am more worried than I have been in the past. It’s scary,” he said. Brin specifically targets Facebook for its unwillingness to share its users’ data with others, claiming it would be impossible to create a company like Google if the internet was dominated by Facebook. “You have to play by their rules, which are really restrictive,” he said. Brin is directly criticizing Google’s competitors here, but he’s in a unique position. On one hand, Google famously pulled out most of its operations in China in the name of free speech in January 2010. Furthemore, Google’s Android mobile platform is open-source, in contrast of Apple’s closed and proprietary iOS platform. On the other, Google itself has often been criticized due to privacy concerns, which prompted the company to release a new, unified privacy policy in February 2012. Google owns a lot of private data about its users, and has at times been forced to hand it to the U.S. authorities. “We do everything possible to protect the data. If we could wave a magic wand and not be subject to US law, that would be great. If we could be in some magical jurisdiction that everyone in the world trusted, that would be great … We’re doing it as well as can be done,” claims Brin. What do you think: Is Google one of those “powerful forces” lined up against the open internet, or is it one of the good guys? Or is the truth somewhere in between? Share your opinions in the comments. -Source: Mashable

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:: Alarm clock requires PIN code to shut up :: There is nothing quite like the feeling of sleeping in on a nice, cool morning (especially when it rains outside), but for the most of us, our sweet rest is interrupted not by a crowing rooster, but the din of an alarm clock. It doesn’t matter whether it is the traditional ring or your favorite artist singing, waking up without getting enough sleep is never a nice feeling to have. Enter this particular alarm clock that ought to help you get out of bed in the most cruel way possible – it lacks a snooze button, and cannot be unplugged to shut it up, with the only alternative to return to your 5 more minutes of slumber being to enter a PIN code. This might very well be the world’s most exasperating alarm clock, and I suppose in a less rational moment, one might actually fling it against the wall in rage. As for the type of sound, it emits the traditional concierge bell that is pressed hard and rapidly, which is a surefire way to irritate any sleeping beauties.

:: Alarm clock requires PIN code to shut up :: There is nothing quite like the feeling of sleeping in on a nice, cool morning (especially when it rains outside), but for the most of us, our sweet rest is interrupted not by a crowing rooster, but the din of an alarm clock. It doesn’t matter whether it is the traditional ring or your favorite artist singing, waking up without getting enough sleep is never a nice feeling to have. Enter this particular alarm clock that ought to help you get out of bed in the most cruel way possible – it lacks a snooze button, and cannot be unplugged to shut it up, with the only alternative to return to your 5 more minutes of slumber being to enter a PIN code. This might very well be the world’s most exasperating alarm clock, and I suppose in a less rational moment, one might actually fling it against the wall in rage. As for the type of sound, it emits the traditional concierge bell that is pressed hard and rapidly, which is a surefire way to irritate any sleeping beauties.

:: Alarm clock requires PIN code to shut up :: There is nothing quite like the feeling of sleeping in on a nice, cool morning (especially when it rains outside), but for the most of us, our sweet rest is interrupted not by a crowing rooster, but the din of an alarm clock. It doesn’t matter whether it is the traditional ring or your favorite artist singing, waking up without getting enough sleep is never a nice feeling to have. Enter this particular alarm clock that ought to help you get out of bed in the most cruel way possible – it lacks a snooze button, and cannot be unplugged to shut it up, with the only alternative to return to your 5 more minutes of slumber being to enter a PIN code. This might very well be the world’s most exasperating alarm clock, and I suppose in a less rational moment, one might actually fling it against the wall in rage. As for the type of sound, it emits the traditional concierge bell that is pressed hard and rapidly, which is a surefire way to irritate any sleeping beauties.

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:: The Web’s Most Buzzworthy Questions of 2011 :: Whether it opens the doors of knowledge or turns us into lazy researchers, the web can instantly gratify most inquiries. 10. What’s the best way to escape the police in a high-speed car chase? Former patrol officer Justin Freeman details what it would take to escape from the police – and why it’s a bad idea. 9. What is the worst piece of design ever done? People responded with more than 100 frustrations, pet peeves and things that could be improved about the world. 8. Is Amy Chua right when she explains “Why Chinese Mothers Are Superior” in an op/ed in the Wall Street Journal? Users shared powerful personal stories about parenting and growing up Asian-American, along with follow-up questions answered by Amy Chua herself. 7. Given our current technology and with the proper training, would it be possible for someone to become Batman? Screenwriter Mark Hughes delivers an extraordinarily entertaining answer about whether it’d possible to be Batman in the real world. 6. Why did Twitter suspend UberTwitter? Bill Gross, founder of UberMedia, shares what happened to his company. 5. Why did Steve Jobs choose not to effectively treat his cancer? Cancer researcher Ramzi Amri takes a sad look back at the progression of Steve Jobs’s disease. 4. How does a programmer become a brogrammer? A discussion of an emerging Silicon Valley subculture 3. What are some interesting examples of photographs which show historical figures in unexpected places or company? Unexpected pairings of historical figures: Bill Clinton with John F. Kennedy, Nikola Tesla with Mark Twain, Salvador Dalí with Walt Disney. 2. What’s it like to be a drug dealer? A nerve-wracking first-person account of one person’s rise and fall in drug trafficking. 1. What’s the most epic photo ever taken? A powerful tour of the most important, most poignant and most beautiful photographs ever taken. Source :- mashable.com

:: Battery Care :: Often we have a habit of charging our batteries (of mobile phones, laptops,etc. ) even when its hardly drained, unknowing of the fact that it's just harming our devices.However even full battery discharges (until laptop power shutdown, 0%) should be avoided, because this stresses the battery a lot and can even damage it. It's recommended to perform partial discharges to capacity levels of 20~30% and frequent charges, instead of performing a full discharging followed by a full charging.One must say again that the battery's worst enemy is the heat, so leaving the laptop in the car in a hot summer day is half way to kill the battery. There a simple ways which are helpful in preserving & extending the battery life of any electronic gadget. :: Extend Mobile Phone Battery Life :: ->Turn-off wireless connection like Wi-Fi if you are not using them. ->Vibrating alert is another big power hungry feature in the mobile phone. Using vibrating alert is good when you are in meetings or in a library, otherwise you can turn off vibrating alert. ->Your mobile phone display also uses lot of power to illuminate. Reduce screen brightness to the lowest level possible where you can see things on the screen clearly. ->Keep your phone screen as simple as possible, using screensavers and animated wallpapers may look pretty but you must remember that they use up the battery power to stay running. ->Terminate applications as soon as you finished working on them. Pressing end key does not terminate the application, they still remain running in the background using up the battery power. ->Games are other power hungry applications, they use lot of power and most of the games do not allow the screen to dim or turn off. Play games less to save more on the battery. ->Try using few email accounts and disable automatic update feature if you do not really need it. ->Turn off BlueTooth when you are not using it. ->Avoid over heating of the battery to prevent damage to the mobile phone and to the battery. Keep your phone away from the direct Sun heat and any other radiations. Source :- Inhouse IT manager + Web!!