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... Moto E launched for Rs 6,999 only for Today | Flipkart server crashes... The new smartphone has an edge to edge display and a curved back. It has a 4.3 inch display with 256 pixel per inch with 960 x 540 pixel resolution. It is powered by a 1.2GHz dual core processor and is paired with 1GB of RAM. It is a dual SIM smartphone with intelligent calling feature, a software enhancement. Motorola claims to offer all day battery with the Moto E. It packs in a 1980 mAh battery. The Motorola Moto E features a 5 MP rear camera with touch capture, has 4GB or internal storage and supports up to 32GB expandable memory. It also comes with a built-in FM radio and features such as Moto Migrate, Moto Alert, etc. The Motorola Moto E went on sale at 0000 hours on May 14 exclusively on Flipkart. Soon after it went on sale, the Flipkart's sever showed the Error 502. The error appeared when the payment gateway tries to redirect to the retailer's webpage. The error 502 states, "There's an error. The server encountered a temporary error and could not serve your request. Please try again in sometime."

... Moto E launched for Rs 6,999 only for Today | Flipkart server crashes... The new smartphone has an edge to edge display and a curved back. It has a 4.3 inch display with 256 pixel per inch with 960 x 540 pixel resolution. It is powered by a 1.2GHz dual core processor and is paired with 1GB of RAM. It is a dual SIM smartphone with intelligent calling feature, a software enhancement. Motorola claims to offer all day battery with the Moto E. It packs in a 1980 mAh battery. The Motorola Moto E features a 5 MP rear camera with touch capture, has 4GB or internal storage and supports up to 32GB expandable memory. It also comes with a built-in FM radio and features such as Moto Migrate, Moto Alert, etc. The Motorola Moto E went on sale at 0000 hours on May 14 exclusively on Flipkart. Soon after it went on sale, the Flipkart's sever showed the Error 502. The error appeared when the payment gateway tries to redirect to the retailer's webpage. The error 502 states, "There's an error. The server encountered a temporary error and could not serve your request. Please try again in sometime."

... Moto E launched for Rs 6,999 only for Today | Flipkart server crashes... The new smartphone has an edge to edge display and a curved back. It has a 4.3 inch display with 256 pixel per inch with 960 x 540 pixel resolution. It is powered by a 1.2GHz dual core processor and is paired with 1GB of RAM. It is a dual SIM smartphone with intelligent calling feature, a software enhancement. Motorola claims to offer all day battery with the Moto E. It packs in a 1980 mAh battery. The Motorola Moto E features a 5 MP rear camera with touch capture, has 4GB or internal storage and supports up to 32GB expandable memory. It also comes with a built-in FM radio and features such as Moto Migrate, Moto Alert, etc. The Motorola Moto E went on sale at 0000 hours on May 14 exclusively on Flipkart. Soon after it went on sale, the Flipkart's sever showed the Error 502. The error appeared when the payment gateway tries to redirect to the retailer's webpage. The error 502 states, "There's an error. The server encountered a temporary error and could not serve your request. Please try again in sometime."

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2013 Invention Awards: Ballast Bulb A household lamp powered by a bag of rocks. More than 780 million people rely on kerosene to light their homes. But the fuel is pricey and is toxic when burned—not to mention a fire hazard. In 2008, London-based product designer Martin Riddiford and his colleague Jim Reeves decided to create a cheap, safe alternative. Riddiford knew a falling weight could produce enough energy to run a grandfather clock, so why not a light? To find out, he attached the crank of a wind-up flashlight to a bicycle wheel. He hung a weight from the wheel to cause it to spin; the wheel cranked the flashlight, and the device lit up. Over the next four years, Riddiford, Reeves, and a small team spent their downtime between projects in a basement, refining the GravityLight. To use it, a person hangs the device and fills an attached fabric bag with up to 28 pounds of rocks, dirt, or other material. Lifting and releasing the bag steadily pulls a notched belt through GravityLight’s plastic hub; the belt spins a series of gears to drive a small motor, which continuously powers an LED for about 30 minutes. The team used crowdfunding to manufacture 1,000 GravityLights, which it plans to send to developing countries for field testing—plus 6,000 more for backers. “It’s exciting to witness so much positive reaction to what we’re doing,” Riddiford says. Besides remote villages, the lamp could prove handy in campsites, closets, and any dark nook far from a socket, so Riddiford also hopes to license a retail version for less than $10. GravityLight: Graham Murdoch HOW IT WORKS 1) As a weighted bag descends, it tugs a belt to turn a series of plastic gears. 2) The gears work in unison to spin an electric motor. 3) The motor powers a small yet bright LED, providing continuous illumination for about 30 minutes—the maximum amount of time that the bag can take to descend. 4) External connectors can power low-voltage devices, and the entire system is designed to work for thousands of lift-and-drop cycles. INVENTORS : Jim Reeves, Martin Riddiford COMPANY : Therefore INVENTION : GravityLight

2013 Invention Awards: Ballast Bulb A household lamp powered by a bag of rocks. More than 780 million people rely on kerosene to light their homes. But the fuel is pricey and is toxic when burned—not to mention a fire hazard. In 2008, London-based product designer Martin Riddiford and his colleague Jim Reeves decided to create a cheap, safe alternative. Riddiford knew a falling weight could produce enough energy to run a grandfather clock, so why not a light? To find out, he attached the crank of a wind-up flashlight to a bicycle wheel. He hung a weight from the wheel to cause it to spin; the wheel cranked the flashlight, and the device lit up. Over the next four years, Riddiford, Reeves, and a small team spent their downtime between projects in a basement, refining the GravityLight. To use it, a person hangs the device and fills an attached fabric bag with up to 28 pounds of rocks, dirt, or other material. Lifting and releasing the bag steadily pulls a notched belt through GravityLight’s plastic hub; the belt spins a series of gears to drive a small motor, which continuously powers an LED for about 30 minutes. The team used crowdfunding to manufacture 1,000 GravityLights, which it plans to send to developing countries for field testing—plus 6,000 more for backers. “It’s exciting to witness so much positive reaction to what we’re doing,” Riddiford says. Besides remote villages, the lamp could prove handy in campsites, closets, and any dark nook far from a socket, so Riddiford also hopes to license a retail version for less than $10. GravityLight: Graham Murdoch HOW IT WORKS 1) As a weighted bag descends, it tugs a belt to turn a series of plastic gears. 2) The gears work in unison to spin an electric motor. 3) The motor powers a small yet bright LED, providing continuous illumination for about 30 minutes—the maximum amount of time that the bag can take to descend. 4) External connectors can power low-voltage devices, and the entire system is designed to work for thousands of lift-and-drop cycles. INVENTORS : Jim Reeves, Martin Riddiford COMPANY : Therefore INVENTION : GravityLight

2013 Invention Awards: Ballast Bulb A household lamp powered by a bag of rocks. More than 780 million people rely on kerosene to light their homes. But the fuel is pricey and is toxic when burned—not to mention a fire hazard. In 2008, London-based product designer Martin Riddiford and his colleague Jim Reeves decided to create a cheap, safe alternative. Riddiford knew a falling weight could produce enough energy to run a grandfather clock, so why not a light? To find out, he attached the crank of a wind-up flashlight to a bicycle wheel. He hung a weight from the wheel to cause it to spin; the wheel cranked the flashlight, and the device lit up. Over the next four years, Riddiford, Reeves, and a small team spent their downtime between projects in a basement, refining the GravityLight. To use it, a person hangs the device and fills an attached fabric bag with up to 28 pounds of rocks, dirt, or other material. Lifting and releasing the bag steadily pulls a notched belt through GravityLight’s plastic hub; the belt spins a series of gears to drive a small motor, which continuously powers an LED for about 30 minutes. The team used crowdfunding to manufacture 1,000 GravityLights, which it plans to send to developing countries for field testing—plus 6,000 more for backers. “It’s exciting to witness so much positive reaction to what we’re doing,” Riddiford says. Besides remote villages, the lamp could prove handy in campsites, closets, and any dark nook far from a socket, so Riddiford also hopes to license a retail version for less than $10. GravityLight: Graham Murdoch HOW IT WORKS 1) As a weighted bag descends, it tugs a belt to turn a series of plastic gears. 2) The gears work in unison to spin an electric motor. 3) The motor powers a small yet bright LED, providing continuous illumination for about 30 minutes—the maximum amount of time that the bag can take to descend. 4) External connectors can power low-voltage devices, and the entire system is designed to work for thousands of lift-and-drop cycles. INVENTORS : Jim Reeves, Martin Riddiford COMPANY : Therefore INVENTION : GravityLight

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What is Google Glass & How it works..? Google Glass is a wearable computer with a head-mounted display, with the mission of producing a mass-market ubiquitous computer. Google Glass displays information in a smartphone-like hands-free format, that can interact with the Internet via natural language voice commands. Well, artist Martin Missfeldt created an infographic that explains the wonders of technology behind Google's technologically-enhanced glasses. At the heart of the tech that makes Google Glass tick are a mini projector and a semi-transparent prism which project an augmented reality layer of information directly to the user's retina. We don't have a lot of the final details on specs just yet - but it is expected Google Glass to run modified Android. Google is considering partnering with sunglass retailers such as Ray-Ban or Warby Parker, and may also open retail stores to allow customers to try on the device. The Explorer Edition cannot be used by people who wear prescription glasses, but Google has confirmed that Glass will eventually work with frames and lenses.

What is Google Glass & How it works..? Google Glass is a wearable computer with a head-mounted display, with the mission of producing a mass-market ubiquitous computer. Google Glass displays information in a smartphone-like hands-free format, that can interact with the Internet via natural language voice commands. Well, artist Martin Missfeldt created an infographic that explains the wonders of technology behind Google's technologically-enhanced glasses. At the heart of the tech that makes Google Glass tick are a mini projector and a semi-transparent prism which project an augmented reality layer of information directly to the user's retina. We don't have a lot of the final details on specs just yet - but it is expected Google Glass to run modified Android. Google is considering partnering with sunglass retailers such as Ray-Ban or Warby Parker, and may also open retail stores to allow customers to try on the device. The Explorer Edition cannot be used by people who wear prescription glasses, but Google has confirmed that Glass will eventually work with frames and lenses.

What is Google Glass & How it works..? Google Glass is a wearable computer with a head-mounted display, with the mission of producing a mass-market ubiquitous computer. Google Glass displays information in a smartphone-like hands-free format, that can interact with the Internet via natural language voice commands. Well, artist Martin Missfeldt created an infographic that explains the wonders of technology behind Google's technologically-enhanced glasses. At the heart of the tech that makes Google Glass tick are a mini projector and a semi-transparent prism which project an augmented reality layer of information directly to the user's retina. We don't have a lot of the final details on specs just yet - but it is expected Google Glass to run modified Android. Google is considering partnering with sunglass retailers such as Ray-Ban or Warby Parker, and may also open retail stores to allow customers to try on the device. The Explorer Edition cannot be used by people who wear prescription glasses, but Google has confirmed that Glass will eventually work with frames and lenses.

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:: ADzero: A smartphone made from bamboo :: A 23-year-old British student will launch a mobile phone made largely from bamboo. The smartphone, called 'ADzero', is expected to launch later this year. Made from four-year-old organically grown bamboo that has been treated to improve its durability, the phone runs Google's Android operating system. Kieron Scott-Woodhouse, from Shepherds Bush in London, designed the phone because he was frustrated that so many existing models looked similar to each other. A technology entrepreneur had contacted him after he posted designs online. The phone was initially intended for the Chinese market but an enthusiastic reception in Britain means it will go on sale in design retailers later this year.

:: ADzero: A smartphone made from bamboo :: A 23-year-old British student will launch a mobile phone made largely from bamboo. The smartphone, called 'ADzero', is expected to launch later this year. Made from four-year-old organically grown bamboo that has been treated to improve its durability, the phone runs Google's Android operating system. Kieron Scott-Woodhouse, from Shepherds Bush in London, designed the phone because he was frustrated that so many existing models looked similar to each other. A technology entrepreneur had contacted him after he posted designs online. The phone was initially intended for the Chinese market but an enthusiastic reception in Britain means it will go on sale in design retailers later this year.

:: ADzero: A smartphone made from bamboo :: A 23-year-old British student will launch a mobile phone made largely from bamboo. The smartphone, called 'ADzero', is expected to launch later this year. Made from four-year-old organically grown bamboo that has been treated to improve its durability, the phone runs Google's Android operating system. Kieron Scott-Woodhouse, from Shepherds Bush in London, designed the phone because he was frustrated that so many existing models looked similar to each other. A technology entrepreneur had contacted him after he posted designs online. The phone was initially intended for the Chinese market but an enthusiastic reception in Britain means it will go on sale in design retailers later this year.

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Amazon.com Facts: 10 Things You Didn’t Know About the Web’s Biggest Retailer One of the giants to survive the dotcom crash, Amazon.com is as much of a landmark on the web as the Eiffel Tower is to Paris. In 16 years, “Wall Street Wunderkind” Jeff Bezos has grown the business from a tiny startup operating on second-hand computers in his garage to a global company with 12 major retail websites. Amazon.com may account for around a third of all U.S. ecommerce sales, boast over 33,000 employees around the world and own such big names as IMDB, Zappos.com, Woot and LOVEFiLM, but how much do you really know about the web’s largest retailer? We’ve dug deep and found 10 fascinating facts about the etailing behemoth that you may not know. Take a look through the slide show and let us know in the comments any Amazon.com tidbits you find interesting.

Amazon.com Facts: 10 Things You Didn’t Know About the Web’s Biggest Retailer One of the giants to survive the dotcom crash, Amazon.com is as much of a landmark on the web as the Eiffel Tower is to Paris. In 16 years, “Wall Street Wunderkind” Jeff Bezos has grown the business from a tiny startup operating on second-hand computers in his garage to a global company with 12 major retail websites. Amazon.com may account for around a third of all U.S. ecommerce sales, boast over 33,000 employees around the world and own such big names as IMDB, Zappos.com, Woot and LOVEFiLM, but how much do you really know about the web’s largest retailer? We’ve dug deep and found 10 fascinating facts about the etailing behemoth that you may not know. Take a look through the slide show and let us know in the comments any Amazon.com tidbits you find interesting.

Amazon.com Facts: 10 Things You Didn’t Know About the Web’s Biggest Retailer One of the giants to survive the dotcom crash, Amazon.com is as much of a landmark on the web as the Eiffel Tower is to Paris. In 16 years, “Wall Street Wunderkind” Jeff Bezos has grown the business from a tiny startup operating on second-hand computers in his garage to a global company with 12 major retail websites. Amazon.com may account for around a third of all U.S. ecommerce sales, boast over 33,000 employees around the world and own such big names as IMDB, Zappos.com, Woot and LOVEFiLM, but how much do you really know about the web’s largest retailer? We’ve dug deep and found 10 fascinating facts about the etailing behemoth that you may not know. Take a look through the slide show and let us know in the comments any Amazon.com tidbits you find interesting.

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