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#CompuBrainChat #TechTalk #CorporateGujarat CompuBrain asks the renowned influencers of Gujarat about their everyday TechToys. Here's our interview with the very dynamic entrepreneur and a Family Industrialist you must read about; Ms. Khusboo Chandrakant Doshi Director, Rajoo Engineers Ltd. These are her daily gadgets. Phone: iPhone 6S Tablet: iPad mini Laptop: Lenovo ThinkPad Television: Samsung 4k SUHD 65" Sound System: Harman Kardon Everyday Apps: Inshorts, Salesforce You can follow her here: www.facebook.com/KhushbooDoshi.24 Keep watching this space for the next exciting interview with another note worthy #Gujarati #CompuBrain #Ahmedabad #SocialMedia2 #RajooEngineers

#CompuBrainChat #TechTalk #CorporateGujarat CompuBrain asks the renowned influencers of Gujarat about their everyday TechToys. Here's our interview with the very dynamic entrepreneur and a Family Industrialist you must read about; Ms. Khusboo Chandrakant Doshi Director, Rajoo Engineers Ltd. These are her daily gadgets. Phone: iPhone 6S Tablet: iPad mini Laptop: Lenovo ThinkPad Television: Samsung 4k SUHD 65" Sound System: Harman Kardon Everyday Apps: Inshorts, Salesforce You can follow her here: www.facebook.com/KhushbooDoshi.24 Keep watching this space for the next exciting interview with another note worthy #Gujarati #CompuBrain #Ahmedabad #SocialMedia2 #RajooEngineers

#CompuBrainChat #TechTalk #CorporateGujarat CompuBrain asks the renowned influencers of Gujarat about their everyday TechToys. Here's our interview with the very dynamic entrepreneur and a Family Industrialist you must read about; Ms. Khusboo Chandrakant Doshi Director, Rajoo Engineers Ltd. These are her daily gadgets. Phone: iPhone 6S Tablet: iPad mini Laptop: Lenovo ThinkPad Television: Samsung 4k SUHD 65" Sound System: Harman Kardon Everyday Apps: Inshorts, Salesforce You can follow her here: www.facebook.com/KhushbooDoshi.24 Keep watching this space for the next exciting interview with another note worthy #Gujarati #CompuBrain #Ahmedabad #SocialMedia2 #RajooEngineers

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#CompuBrainChat #TechTalk #CorporateAhmedabad CompuBrain asks the renowned influencers of Ahmedabad about their everyday TechToys. Here's our first interview with the very dynamic Realtor and the Youth Icon every Amdavadi Businessman aspires to be; Mr. Jaxay Shah MD, Savvy Infrastructures Ltd. Promoter, Kensville Golf & Country Club These are his daily gadgets. Phone: iPhone 6s Tablet: iPad Pro Laptop/Desktop: iMac Camera: Nikon D5 Television: Samsung 4k SUHD 65" Sound System: Harman Kardon Everyday Apps: Twitter & Instagram Personal Music: Bang & Olufsen Wearable Tech: Apple Watch You can follow him here: www.facebook.com/jaxay.shah www.twitter.com/jaxayshah www.instagram.com/jaxay_shah Keep watching this space for the next exciting interview with another note worthy #Amdavadi #CompuBrain #Ahmedabad #SocialMedia2 #SavvyGroup

#CompuBrainChat #TechTalk #CorporateAhmedabad CompuBrain asks the renowned influencers of Ahmedabad about their everyday TechToys. Here's our first interview with the very dynamic Realtor and the Youth Icon every Amdavadi Businessman aspires to be; Mr. Jaxay Shah MD, Savvy Infrastructures Ltd. Promoter, Kensville Golf & Country Club These are his daily gadgets. Phone: iPhone 6s Tablet: iPad Pro Laptop/Desktop: iMac Camera: Nikon D5 Television: Samsung 4k SUHD 65" Sound System: Harman Kardon Everyday Apps: Twitter & Instagram Personal Music: Bang & Olufsen Wearable Tech: Apple Watch You can follow him here: www.facebook.com/jaxay.shah www.twitter.com/jaxayshah www.instagram.com/jaxay_shah Keep watching this space for the next exciting interview with another note worthy #Amdavadi #CompuBrain #Ahmedabad #SocialMedia2 #SavvyGroup

#CompuBrainChat #TechTalk #CorporateAhmedabad CompuBrain asks the renowned influencers of Ahmedabad about their everyday TechToys. Here's our first interview with the very dynamic Realtor and the Youth Icon every Amdavadi Businessman aspires to be; Mr. Jaxay Shah MD, Savvy Infrastructures Ltd. Promoter, Kensville Golf & Country Club These are his daily gadgets. Phone: iPhone 6s Tablet: iPad Pro Laptop/Desktop: iMac Camera: Nikon D5 Television: Samsung 4k SUHD 65" Sound System: Harman Kardon Everyday Apps: Twitter & Instagram Personal Music: Bang & Olufsen Wearable Tech: Apple Watch You can follow him here: www.facebook.com/jaxay.shah www.twitter.com/jaxayshah www.instagram.com/jaxay_shah Keep watching this space for the next exciting interview with another note worthy #Amdavadi #CompuBrain #Ahmedabad #SocialMedia2 #SavvyGroup

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... The evolution of the Internet ... The evolution of the Internet has shifted the relationships between sellers and buyers. The first era of the internet was one-way, allowing corporations to better market their products to more customers. The second era was social, empowering everyone to share their ideas. The third era – the sharing economy – empowers customers to share actual goods and services, thereby enabling the peer-to-peer dynamics to undermine corporate dominance.

... The evolution of the Internet ... The evolution of the Internet has shifted the relationships between sellers and buyers. The first era of the internet was one-way, allowing corporations to better market their products to more customers. The second era was social, empowering everyone to share their ideas. The third era – the sharing economy – empowers customers to share actual goods and services, thereby enabling the peer-to-peer dynamics to undermine corporate dominance.

... The evolution of the Internet ... The evolution of the Internet has shifted the relationships between sellers and buyers. The first era of the internet was one-way, allowing corporations to better market their products to more customers. The second era was social, empowering everyone to share their ideas. The third era – the sharing economy – empowers customers to share actual goods and services, thereby enabling the peer-to-peer dynamics to undermine corporate dominance.

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:: How Google's Drive helps kill Microsoft's Office :: This is how a search company can steal the productivity business: By storing work, not helping users edit it. Google's hard drive in the sky, Google Drive, is a big threat to other cloud storage products like Dropbox and Box. But it's also a stab straight at the heart of Microsoft's mainstream business software, Microsoft Office. While Google's productivity application suites, Docs (now incorporated into Drive) and Apps (for businesses), have been making some headway into Microsoft Office's territory, the important battlefield is not the application. It's the data. If Google can move the battlefield to a place where it has the bigger army and better weapons, the whole game changes. Google Drive might make that happen. Let's look at the world from behind Google-colored glasses. Every time a user performs a search in the Google search engine, or clicks a link in Chrome, or +1s an item in Plus, Google adds an atom of data to its knowledge of what people like and what they do. This information helps Google index the Web and rank its results when people are searching for something. This is also the Facebook model, by the way. Moreover, every action that generates user data that doesn't touch down in a Google product or service deprives Google of information that it could otherwise use to index and understand the Web of human knowledge and preference. Microsoft Word documents stored on PCs? In the most uncharitable view, every one is money being stolen from Google. All closed, siloed apps, for that matter, remove opportunity from Google. Co-founder Sergey Brin has recently spoken out against apps and companies that wall off data from the open Internet. There is indeed a danger, but it's not just about openness, it's about Google's own ability to index the data. Back to Google Drive: By acting as the substrate for user data -- in other words, the file system -- Google gets exposed to many times more information. Google doesn't need, and in fact has no reason, to make this data public, but having it available to index and cross-reference does make the company's core service, targeted advertising, more valuable. The more data Google has, the more valuable its product becomes. And that product, in case it's not already clear, is you. Your attention, which is sold to advertisers. Microsoft's main product, meanwhile, is software, not data. (And its customers aren't advertisers, but people who buy software.) So why can't Microsoft's model and Google's live in harmony? Because Microsoft's software suite consists of application software and an operating system, and the operating system stores user data, and the data is what Google wants. So Google is undermining that function with Google Drive, and not just by offering a synchronized file system (which, by the way, Microsoft also offers). Once users put their data in Google Drive, they will also find out how easy it is to open these files in non-Microsoft apps. This is one of the reasons Google is launching Google Drive with an API for developers and a suite of partner products that shave off Microsoft customers a bit at a time. One of the most important features that third-party developers are using with Google Drive is the "Open with" feature. If you upload a Microsoft Project file to Drive, for example, you can open it with the Web app SmartSheet, directly on the Web. Similarly, Web apps like SlideRocket can open PowerPoint files. Google's own productivity apps can also open Microsoft files. The more people realize that they don't need Office to access their archives of files from the pre-Google Drive era, the more likely they are to look to Google Drive (or perhaps competing products, if they have similar partners) as primary storage. And Google wins, while Microsoft loses. How can Microsoft counter this market erosion at Google's hands? The company has its own cloud storage product and a strong history with developers. And it has the business customers. But according to a Google Drive developer I spoke with, one who's been dealing also with Microsoft for years, Microsoft is not there yet. It has the centralized storage in SkyDrive and Office 365, but not the infrastructure -- especially the identity and sign-on tools -- that developers need to integrate into the Microsoft cloud. Microsoft also needs to protect its software licensing revenue for Office. Google, the upstart in business software, can undercut Microsoft's prices since all its software sales are incremental on top of its search and advertising businesses. Other companies realize that whoever controls the data controls the market. Box, for instance, just launched OneCloud, which lets you open documents in a variety of apps. It's mobile-only so far, though. It is no longer a PC world, and because of that Microsoft doesn't own the world of work. People do their jobs on their own computers, on the Web, and on mobile devices; and they expect their work to follow them onto whatever hardware they're using. Every major technology company understands this. But only a few have the products, the infrastructure, and the freedom to get ahead of the shift.

:: How Google's Drive helps kill Microsoft's Office :: This is how a search company can steal the productivity business: By storing work, not helping users edit it. Google's hard drive in the sky, Google Drive, is a big threat to other cloud storage products like Dropbox and Box. But it's also a stab straight at the heart of Microsoft's mainstream business software, Microsoft Office. While Google's productivity application suites, Docs (now incorporated into Drive) and Apps (for businesses), have been making some headway into Microsoft Office's territory, the important battlefield is not the application. It's the data. If Google can move the battlefield to a place where it has the bigger army and better weapons, the whole game changes. Google Drive might make that happen. Let's look at the world from behind Google-colored glasses. Every time a user performs a search in the Google search engine, or clicks a link in Chrome, or +1s an item in Plus, Google adds an atom of data to its knowledge of what people like and what they do. This information helps Google index the Web and rank its results when people are searching for something. This is also the Facebook model, by the way. Moreover, every action that generates user data that doesn't touch down in a Google product or service deprives Google of information that it could otherwise use to index and understand the Web of human knowledge and preference. Microsoft Word documents stored on PCs? In the most uncharitable view, every one is money being stolen from Google. All closed, siloed apps, for that matter, remove opportunity from Google. Co-founder Sergey Brin has recently spoken out against apps and companies that wall off data from the open Internet. There is indeed a danger, but it's not just about openness, it's about Google's own ability to index the data. Back to Google Drive: By acting as the substrate for user data -- in other words, the file system -- Google gets exposed to many times more information. Google doesn't need, and in fact has no reason, to make this data public, but having it available to index and cross-reference does make the company's core service, targeted advertising, more valuable. The more data Google has, the more valuable its product becomes. And that product, in case it's not already clear, is you. Your attention, which is sold to advertisers. Microsoft's main product, meanwhile, is software, not data. (And its customers aren't advertisers, but people who buy software.) So why can't Microsoft's model and Google's live in harmony? Because Microsoft's software suite consists of application software and an operating system, and the operating system stores user data, and the data is what Google wants. So Google is undermining that function with Google Drive, and not just by offering a synchronized file system (which, by the way, Microsoft also offers). Once users put their data in Google Drive, they will also find out how easy it is to open these files in non-Microsoft apps. This is one of the reasons Google is launching Google Drive with an API for developers and a suite of partner products that shave off Microsoft customers a bit at a time. One of the most important features that third-party developers are using with Google Drive is the "Open with" feature. If you upload a Microsoft Project file to Drive, for example, you can open it with the Web app SmartSheet, directly on the Web. Similarly, Web apps like SlideRocket can open PowerPoint files. Google's own productivity apps can also open Microsoft files. The more people realize that they don't need Office to access their archives of files from the pre-Google Drive era, the more likely they are to look to Google Drive (or perhaps competing products, if they have similar partners) as primary storage. And Google wins, while Microsoft loses. How can Microsoft counter this market erosion at Google's hands? The company has its own cloud storage product and a strong history with developers. And it has the business customers. But according to a Google Drive developer I spoke with, one who's been dealing also with Microsoft for years, Microsoft is not there yet. It has the centralized storage in SkyDrive and Office 365, but not the infrastructure -- especially the identity and sign-on tools -- that developers need to integrate into the Microsoft cloud. Microsoft also needs to protect its software licensing revenue for Office. Google, the upstart in business software, can undercut Microsoft's prices since all its software sales are incremental on top of its search and advertising businesses. Other companies realize that whoever controls the data controls the market. Box, for instance, just launched OneCloud, which lets you open documents in a variety of apps. It's mobile-only so far, though. It is no longer a PC world, and because of that Microsoft doesn't own the world of work. People do their jobs on their own computers, on the Web, and on mobile devices; and they expect their work to follow them onto whatever hardware they're using. Every major technology company understands this. But only a few have the products, the infrastructure, and the freedom to get ahead of the shift.

:: How Google's Drive helps kill Microsoft's Office :: This is how a search company can steal the productivity business: By storing work, not helping users edit it. Google's hard drive in the sky, Google Drive, is a big threat to other cloud storage products like Dropbox and Box. But it's also a stab straight at the heart of Microsoft's mainstream business software, Microsoft Office. While Google's productivity application suites, Docs (now incorporated into Drive) and Apps (for businesses), have been making some headway into Microsoft Office's territory, the important battlefield is not the application. It's the data. If Google can move the battlefield to a place where it has the bigger army and better weapons, the whole game changes. Google Drive might make that happen. Let's look at the world from behind Google-colored glasses. Every time a user performs a search in the Google search engine, or clicks a link in Chrome, or +1s an item in Plus, Google adds an atom of data to its knowledge of what people like and what they do. This information helps Google index the Web and rank its results when people are searching for something. This is also the Facebook model, by the way. Moreover, every action that generates user data that doesn't touch down in a Google product or service deprives Google of information that it could otherwise use to index and understand the Web of human knowledge and preference. Microsoft Word documents stored on PCs? In the most uncharitable view, every one is money being stolen from Google. All closed, siloed apps, for that matter, remove opportunity from Google. Co-founder Sergey Brin has recently spoken out against apps and companies that wall off data from the open Internet. There is indeed a danger, but it's not just about openness, it's about Google's own ability to index the data. Back to Google Drive: By acting as the substrate for user data -- in other words, the file system -- Google gets exposed to many times more information. Google doesn't need, and in fact has no reason, to make this data public, but having it available to index and cross-reference does make the company's core service, targeted advertising, more valuable. The more data Google has, the more valuable its product becomes. And that product, in case it's not already clear, is you. Your attention, which is sold to advertisers. Microsoft's main product, meanwhile, is software, not data. (And its customers aren't advertisers, but people who buy software.) So why can't Microsoft's model and Google's live in harmony? Because Microsoft's software suite consists of application software and an operating system, and the operating system stores user data, and the data is what Google wants. So Google is undermining that function with Google Drive, and not just by offering a synchronized file system (which, by the way, Microsoft also offers). Once users put their data in Google Drive, they will also find out how easy it is to open these files in non-Microsoft apps. This is one of the reasons Google is launching Google Drive with an API for developers and a suite of partner products that shave off Microsoft customers a bit at a time. One of the most important features that third-party developers are using with Google Drive is the "Open with" feature. If you upload a Microsoft Project file to Drive, for example, you can open it with the Web app SmartSheet, directly on the Web. Similarly, Web apps like SlideRocket can open PowerPoint files. Google's own productivity apps can also open Microsoft files. The more people realize that they don't need Office to access their archives of files from the pre-Google Drive era, the more likely they are to look to Google Drive (or perhaps competing products, if they have similar partners) as primary storage. And Google wins, while Microsoft loses. How can Microsoft counter this market erosion at Google's hands? The company has its own cloud storage product and a strong history with developers. And it has the business customers. But according to a Google Drive developer I spoke with, one who's been dealing also with Microsoft for years, Microsoft is not there yet. It has the centralized storage in SkyDrive and Office 365, but not the infrastructure -- especially the identity and sign-on tools -- that developers need to integrate into the Microsoft cloud. Microsoft also needs to protect its software licensing revenue for Office. Google, the upstart in business software, can undercut Microsoft's prices since all its software sales are incremental on top of its search and advertising businesses. Other companies realize that whoever controls the data controls the market. Box, for instance, just launched OneCloud, which lets you open documents in a variety of apps. It's mobile-only so far, though. It is no longer a PC world, and because of that Microsoft doesn't own the world of work. People do their jobs on their own computers, on the Web, and on mobile devices; and they expect their work to follow them onto whatever hardware they're using. Every major technology company understands this. But only a few have the products, the infrastructure, and the freedom to get ahead of the shift.

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:: A new initiative to tackle cyber threats launched at WEF :: A new initiative on cyber security has been launched at the World Economic Forum to strengthen efforts to combat rising cyber risks. The initiative 'Partnering for Cyber Resilience' is a set of shared principles, endorsed by chief executives of firms that recognise interdependence of organisations in tackling cyber risks, according to a statement from the WEF. Citing the importance of the initiative, India's largest software exporter TCS CEO and MD N Chandrasekaran underlined the need for consistent processes and uniform policy framework (in the digital world) that can be implemented internationally. The new programme would engage the corporate firms into working towards a safer digital environment. "We need to recognize that making the world more resilient to cyber-risks is a challenge that can only be addressed collectively by policy-makers, business and civil society," Alan Marcus, senior director and head of Information Technology and Telecommunications Industries at WEF USA, said. "Everything attached to a network can be hacked and everything is being attached to a network," Rod A Beckstrom, president and chief executive officer of the Internet Corp of Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN), said. US consultancy major Deloitte LLP was project advisor to the programme, developed through multi-stakeholder dialogue across the globe. Source :- ibnlive.com

:: A new initiative to tackle cyber threats launched at WEF :: A new initiative on cyber security has been launched at the World Economic Forum to strengthen efforts to combat rising cyber risks. The initiative 'Partnering for Cyber Resilience' is a set of shared principles, endorsed by chief executives of firms that recognise interdependence of organisations in tackling cyber risks, according to a statement from the WEF. Citing the importance of the initiative, India's largest software exporter TCS CEO and MD N Chandrasekaran underlined the need for consistent processes and uniform policy framework (in the digital world) that can be implemented internationally. The new programme would engage the corporate firms into working towards a safer digital environment. "We need to recognize that making the world more resilient to cyber-risks is a challenge that can only be addressed collectively by policy-makers, business and civil society," Alan Marcus, senior director and head of Information Technology and Telecommunications Industries at WEF USA, said. "Everything attached to a network can be hacked and everything is being attached to a network," Rod A Beckstrom, president and chief executive officer of the Internet Corp of Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN), said. US consultancy major Deloitte LLP was project advisor to the programme, developed through multi-stakeholder dialogue across the globe. Source :- ibnlive.com

:: A new initiative to tackle cyber threats launched at WEF :: A new initiative on cyber security has been launched at the World Economic Forum to strengthen efforts to combat rising cyber risks. The initiative 'Partnering for Cyber Resilience' is a set of shared principles, endorsed by chief executives of firms that recognise interdependence of organisations in tackling cyber risks, according to a statement from the WEF. Citing the importance of the initiative, India's largest software exporter TCS CEO and MD N Chandrasekaran underlined the need for consistent processes and uniform policy framework (in the digital world) that can be implemented internationally. The new programme would engage the corporate firms into working towards a safer digital environment. "We need to recognize that making the world more resilient to cyber-risks is a challenge that can only be addressed collectively by policy-makers, business and civil society," Alan Marcus, senior director and head of Information Technology and Telecommunications Industries at WEF USA, said. "Everything attached to a network can be hacked and everything is being attached to a network," Rod A Beckstrom, president and chief executive officer of the Internet Corp of Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN), said. US consultancy major Deloitte LLP was project advisor to the programme, developed through multi-stakeholder dialogue across the globe. Source :- ibnlive.com

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